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The History of Rogerthorpe Manor Hotel, Badsworth, researched by Charles L. Birdsall and Friends.

 

ROGERTHORPE MANOR

Introduction

There has been human activity in the vicinity of Rogerthorpe Manor from very early times. A New Stone Age ring ditch has been found close by which dates from about the time of Stonehenge when the very early farmers were starting to use the resources of the area. Aerial photography suggests there may have been at least one round barrow which has been ploughed out over the years where people, probably originating from the Mediterranean area, buried the cremated remains of their dead. The Romans too had a hand in shaping the surrounding district. Roman coins have been found at Thorpe Audlin and the present road which passes through that village linking Doncaster ( itself a Roman settlement as the " caster " tells us ) with Pontefract is Roman in origin.

Of Saxons and Normans

In 1066 King Harold had to defend his kingdom on two fronts. He was attacked by the Norwegians in the North and the Normans in the South.

Harold and his Saxon army gained a decisive victory over the Norwegians at the Battle of Stamford Bridge just outside of York. There was a local tale that after this battle a chase took place ending up with a Norwegian fighting a Saxon on Standing Flat Bridge which still carries the Doncaster - Pontefract road over the River Went about 200 metres on the Pontefract side of the cross roads at Thorpe Audlin. The story is very similar to that of the actual battle at Stamford Bridge. It is so similar in fact that at one time in the 19th Century it was suggested that the battle occurred at Thorpe Audlin.

Harold lost his life and crown to William the Conqueror at Hastings in 1066 and England was subsequently subject to Norman laws and institutions.

King William owned all the land and parcelled it out amongst his followers. They in turn allocated some of their lands to their followers and so on down the line. A grant of land was given in return for services and / or goods. At a later period money replaced some of these goods and services. Not infrequently land was given to churches and monasteries as a form of insurance for the donor's afterlife. It was sometimes stipulated that masses were to be said for the departed souls of the donor and his family.

By 1085 William was somewhat concerned as to who owned what and how much it was all worth. At the Christmas court at Gloucester it was decided to carry out a great survey. This survey resulted in the compilation of the Domesday Book.

The Domesday Book

Information was gathered about estates across the land and Rogerthorpe, like hundreds of other settlements, made its first recorded appearance.


Briefly the survey set out to answer the questions ;

who owns what now ?
who owned it in 1066 ?
what was it worth then and now ?
how much revenue could it supply ?


The return in respect of Rogerthorpe was included in that for Badsworth, Thorpe Audlin and Upton. It would be reasonable to assume that the main settlement was at Badsworth which was probably the centre of a Saxon / Danish estate prior to the conquest. The church for the area is recorded as being at Badsworth. It is thought that after conversion to Christianity landowners provided a church for their estate. This eventually gave rise to the Parish and explains why it was normal, until recent times, for landowners, not bishops, to appoint priests to their churches.

The derivation of the names of the surrounding settlements also seem to suggest that Badsworth was the centre of power.

Badsworth = Baeddi's worth. Baeddi is the name of the first person associated with the settlement and "worth" means an enclosed sure about a village.

Upton is literally the Up Town relative to Badsworth as it is on the hill above.

Thorpe means a farm or very small outlying settlement relative to a larger village. ( in all probability, Badsworth ).

Rogerthorpe is the settlement associated possibly with rye or more likely a person called Rugar.

Thorpe Audlin is the settlement associated with a person named Aldeline or Aldhelm although the Domesday Book simply refers to it as "Thorp".

" In Badsworth, Upton & Rogerthorpe (Manor), 2 brothers had 9 carucates & 5 bovates of land taxable where 6 ploughs are possible. Now Ilbert has 1.5 ploughs and 13 villages & 11 small holders who have 5 ploughs. A church is there and a priest. Meadow, 1.5 acres; woodland pasture, 1 league long & 3 furlongs wide. Value before 1066 £3; now the same.

In Thorpe [ Audlin ] Alsige had 6 carucates & 3 bovates of land taxable where 5 ploughs are possible. Now Ralph has (it) from Ilbert. He himself (has) there 1.5 ploughs and 8 villagers & 6 smallholders who have 3.5 ploughs. There is there, 1 millsite; meadow, i acre. Value before 1066 £4: now 40/-."

For those who enjoy mental gymnastics the following information is useful :-

A carucate of land is that area which will provide enough food to support a household and will thus vary from place to place according to the fertility of the soil. It approximates to about 120 acres.

The Carucate is subdivided such that

1 Carucate = 4 Yokes
1 Yoke = 2 Bovates

The Carucate was derived from the Caruca, a plough pulled by 8 oxen which was reckoned to be capable of ploughing an acre in the forenoon. The Bovate comes 1 oxen thus is equals 1/8th of a Carucate. ( If you lived in the South of England you calculated in terms of Hides unless you lived in Kent where the unit was the Sulung. The modern move to metrication does have its advantages ! ).

The term plough in the book equates to 8 oxen thus Ilber has 12 oxen ( ie 1.5
ploughs ). The mill would have been a water mill as windmills were not known in this country.

The names of the brothers who owned the land in 1066 are unknown. They were probably 2 brothers who inherited the estate from their father. The Ilber referred to is Ilbert de Lacy of Pontefract Castle.

Rogerthorpe Manor Owners and Residents

Land ownership was a technical business and has its own terms which are worth clarifying.

Although today we often use the terms "village" and "manor" in an interchangeable way there is a difference. A "village" is a small rural community usually principally engaged in agricultural activities. A "manor" on the other hand is a unit of lordship which may include one, some or no "villages". The Lord of the Manor derived his income from the sale of produce on his own land ( the home farm or "desmene" ),
rents from dependant tenantry and profits of jurisdiction exercised in the manoral court. A particular lord may have had estates made up of many manors ( sometimes
referred to as an "Honour" as in the Honour of Pontefract ) some of which, with their desmenes, he may rent to others. A tenant living in the manor would not be Lord of the Manor and his income would only be derived from sale of produce from the land he was renting plus any income from subletting. Even purchase of the manor house and lands would not necessarily confer the lordship of the manor on the purchaser.

In early times our ancestors banded together for their own defence and to maintain law and order in their society. These groups were usually referred to as "Hundreds" in the South of England and "Wapentakes" in the North. The area over which a manoral
court had jurisdiction was known as a "Soke" or "Bailiwick". Thus Rogerthorpe together with Badsworth and Upton formed a Soke which was part of the Osgoldcross Wapentake. All of this was part of the Honour of Pontefract.

To produce a definitive list of those who owned the manor and / or lived upon it is virtually impossible because:

* the exact extent of the lands owned by the manor is unknown,

* as mentioned above the residents were not necessarily the owners,

* when land was granted or sold to others it did not necessarily involve the
total manor holdings. Parcels of land only may have been transacted.

* In many instances residence / ownership is inferred from documents such as records of fines etc and the inference may not always be correct.

The owner of The Honour of Pontefract, which included Rogerthorpe Manor, at the time of the Domesday Book in 1086 was Ilbert de Lacy of Pontefract Castle. William the Conqueror granted many estates to Ilbert and it is a certainty that Ilbert did not live at Rogerthorpe.

Shortly after the compilation of the Domesday Book the de la Val family acquired the estate because 6 carucates of land in Rogerthorpe and Thorpe Audlin were granted to the Augustinian Canons at Nostell Priory in 1166 by Hugh de la Val.

At some time between 1177 and 1193 Prior Arkentill of Nostell Priory released the claim on the land to Robert de Lacy. This was during the time of Richard the Lion Heart; a period of time we popularly associate with the crusades and Robin Hood. Rogerthorpe is situated on the edge of Barnsdale Forest where the Robin of legend had many adventures.

Much as the thought of Robin entertaining Robert de Lacy in the greenwood is appealing it simply could not have happened. There are many theories as to who Robin Hood actually was and some associate him with this area although at a much later date.
One of the many anachronisms in the popular tale is the presence of Friar Tuck. There were no Friars in this country until after the death of King John who followed King Richard.

A survey in 1316 showed that the settlement at Rogerthorpe was in decline. At that time Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, held the Honour of Pontefract.

Thomas was at odds with his cousin Edward II over the latter's excesses and favouritism towards Piers Gaveston ( the King's "friend" ). In 1321 Thomas had Gaveston executed. Thomas himself was beheaded for treason in Pontefract Castle in 1321 after he had been captured by Edward II at the battle of Boroughbridge. Thomas's lands were confiscated by the Crown. These lands, however, were shortly returned to his brother, Henry, Earl of Lancaster, after he led a revolt and replaced Edward II with Edward III. On the death of Henry's son, another Henry, in 1361 the Honour of Pontefract passed to John of Gaunt ( the third son of Edward III referred to in Shakespear's "Richard II" as "Time-honour'd Lancaster" ) who has married Henry's daughter Blanche de Lacy.

In 1343 Sir Simon de Balderstone purchased land in Rogerthorpe from Adam son of Adam de Leythorpe and Robert son of Adam Karkeys. Richard de Balderstone, probably a descendant of Sir Simon, granted his manor of Rogerthorpe to John Ellyswyk and William Cumbulholme in 1442.

In 1598 the first mention of the name Huntington (see History of Thorpe Audlin) appears in the Robin Hood stories "The downfall of Robert Earl of Huntington " by the Elizabethan playwright Anthony Munday. There is some speculation that this was a fictitious title and that if such a person did exist he was from humbler beginnings, e.g. Wakefield (Phillips & Keatman 1995). This Huntington if it were related is supposedly the place of that name now located in the northern fringes of York. It just seems coincidental that the name Huntington is right in the area where the fugitives of the Boroughbridge battle in 1322 probably fled into what was then the Forest of Barnsdale. What were the origins of this family? Was it this area or more likely Huntington,York?
(http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Lane/8771/wakerobin.html)"

There is another jump of almost 200 years to 1610, during the reign of James I, when Walter Rudston is recorded as living here and the plot now thickens.

Walter Rudston is mentioned as living at Rogerthorpe in 1610 : There is a view that Walter never lived anywhere other than his family seat at Hayton. It could have been William, son of Walter and younger brother of Sir Walter, who lived there for a time, but that would not have been until the late 1620s.

Walter Rudston
Born - 1571 or 1572
Died - 13 December 1641
Married - (1) 1597 : Frances, daughter of (Philip?) Constable of Everingham , by licence at Everingham
(2) 12 October 1615 : Elizabeth Saltonstall , widow, of Holy Trinity, Hull; at North Newbald

— William Born - c.1602
Died - ? (after 1644)
Married - 1629 : Hester ?(Savile) of Grove, Notts, or Barrowby nr Grantham, Lincs
— ( Hester, m. William Calverley)
— (Charles Calverley, m. Catherine Mitchell)
— William Calverley (1710-1794) m. Jane Binnington
— Rudston Calverley, b. 1739 : inherited the Rudston estates & adopted surname Rudston.

— Barbara Born - c.1600–1601
Died - 6 March 1644, at Badsworth
Married - 30 July 1619, Samuel Saltonstall of Rogerthorpe nr. Badsworth
— Samuel Saltonstall Born - ?
Died - ?
Married - 15 February 1641-42 : Barbara Flower of Methley , at St. Mary Castlegate, York
— Samuel married (1) Mary dau. of John Shann of Methley
— 3 sons, 1 dau; all died young.
(2) Mary dau. of Richard Elmhirst, at Kirk Smeaton, 15 Aug. 1678
— Richard;William(of Leeds) b. 5 Aug1684; Thomas
— Elizabeth; Anne; Mary

— Walter Rudston Saltonstall

— Thomas Rudston Saltonstall Born (5 February 1635)
Died - ?

— Richard Rudston Saltonstall (died young)

— Frances Rudston Saltonstall, married —?— Ross of London

— Catherine Born - after 1612, perhaps after 1615.
Died - ? (after 1651)
Married - William Leigh of (Carlton, in Rothwell, or Middleton, nr. Leeds)
— William Leigh, baptised 17 February 1648-9 at Methley
— Anne Leigh, born 9 June 1647 at Methley


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1615 : Marriage licence for Walter Rudston of Hayton, Esq., & Elizabeth Saltonstall of Holy Trinity, Hull, Widow – at either place.

12 October 1615 : Walter Rudston married to Elizabeth Saltonstall at North Newbald.

1619 : – Marriage licence for Barbara Rudston of Hayton, & Samuel Saltonstall of Badsworth – at either place.

8 January 1619-1620 : Walter Rudston & Elizabeth his wife, & Sir Philip Constable of Everingham, Sir Thomas Metham of Metham, & Henry Stapleton esq. of Wighill : Deed of Gift of the Manor of Hayton, commonly called ‘Rudston Manor’, and lands &c in Hayton and other places; to Walter Rudston, gent, son and heir of the aforesaid Walter Rudston.
Witnesses : Marmaduke Constable, Roger Constable, Bartholomew Constable, Samuel Saltonstall et alia.

1629 : Marriage licence for William Rudston, of Badsworth & Hesther ?(Saville) of Grove – at either place.

1749 : Chancery Proceedings
“Rudston vs. Saltonstall”
(this is in connection with the will of Elizabeth Cutler, last of the line of Rudstons, who died in 1745. In it she left property in Welwick (Holderness) to Walter Saltonstall, and named Robert son of Thomas Saltonstall of Pontefract as one of those – in a comprehensive listing of possible claimants – who might inherit the whole of the rest of the Rudston estates.)

This is by way of a summary.

1 Nicholas Rudston c.1485 - 1559; son & heir -
2 John Rudston, c.1535 - 1597/8; son & heir -
3 Walter Rudston, 1571/2 - 1641; son & heir -
4 Walter Rudston, c.1598 - 1650, created Baronet 1642.

For all or most of the reign of Elizabeth, the Rudston family of Hayton was strongly Catholic, as were most of their neighbours. John had a sister, Ursula, who married into the family of Wright in Holderness : Ursula's sons Jack and Kit Wright were conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot, and one of her daughters (Martha) married Thomas Percy, another conspirator; another daughter (Ursula) was the mother of Mary Ward, of whom the Archbishop of Canterbury once said that "That woman had done more damage than many priests, and he would exchange six or seven Jesuits for her".

Up to 1605 Walter(3) seems also to have been a Catholic; his sister Ursula married Marmaduke Dolman of Pocklington, brother of Sir Robert Dolman who in about 1620 moved his family to Badsworth. After 1605, and presumably as a result of the crackdown on Catholics that followed the Gunpowder Plot's discovery, he seems to have disavowed Catholicism and embraced Puritanism.
After the death of his first (Catholic) wife, in 1613 Walter remarried in 1615 Elizabeth Saltonstall (of Holy Trinity, Hull) : the marriage took place at North Newbald, whose vicar at the time was Thomas Sugden, later the Vicar of Hayton, "a noted Puritan". Why Richard Sugden, then Vicar at Hayton, did not marry them is unclear.

It is after this marriage that the Rudstons forge links with the area around Badsworth and Rogerthorpe area :

- In 1619 the (eldest?) daughter of Walter(3), Barbara, was married to Samuel Saltonstall, and in January 1620 Samuel Saltonstall - her husband, or her father-in-law? - was a witness to the transfer of the manor of Hayton to Walter Rudston(4). From this marriage came the Saltonstalls of Methley - for descendants see Thoresby, "Ducatus Leodiensis". He seems to have remarried someone named Dorothy; and was buried at Badsworth 12 Dec 1657.
His father, also Samuel Saltonstall, is stated in YAJ 13 (p. 215) to have been of Huntwick Grange, par. Wragby (and is stated to be of Huntwick in his licence to marry Elizabeth Armin - YAJ 11, p. 237), The family owned land in Rookes, par. Halifax, in Saltonstall, in Rogerthorpe par. Badsworth, and also Winteredge Hall at Hipperholme. His father’s brother Richard Saltonstall was Lord Mayor of London in 1597; his half-brother Sir Richard Saltonstall sold his lands in 1625 and emigrated with his family to New England; he left a legacy in his will to Harvard College.

- In 1629 the second son of Walter(3), William, was stated to be "of
Badsworth" when a licence to marry Hesther Savile (or Nevile?) of Grove was issued.

- Catherine, a younger daughter of Walter(3), married William Leigh of
Carlton, in Rothwell, or Middleton, nr. Leeds - described as "Lieut-Col. Leigh" in 1651. There was a case in Chancery in 1652, "Leigh vs. Rudston"; another in 1655, "Rudston & others vs. Leigh & others".

- Walter(4), the heir of Walter(3), married in 1631 Margaret Dawnay of
Cowicke, near Snaith - a Legard on her mother's side.

The booklet (and website) state that Walter Rudston was living at Rogerthorpe in 1610 : where did this information come from? Walter is well attested at Hayton in 1610 and 1611, but it is not impossible that he was in Badsworth or Rogerthorpe some of the time : it would be interesting to know what took him there.





At the time of his death James I owned the Honour of Pontefract and James was greatly in debt to the merchants of the City of London. The Lord Mayor of London in 1597 was the wealthy man of consequence, Sir Richard Saltonstal. In the early 1600's the resident at Rogerthorpe, and man who started to build the present house, was Samuel Saltonstal whom we shall refer to as Samuel ( I ).

Samuel ( I ) was the son of Samuel Saltonstal of the Rookes in Hipperholm and nephew of the Lord Mayor. We also know that Samuel ( I ) married the daughter of William Rudston of Hayton who is recorded as living in the house in 1610 although neither Rudston nor Saltonstal are evident from a legal case in 1570. Did Samuel ( I )
acquire the estate via the influence of his uncle who perhaps had contacts "in the City"
for land which King James had sold to help meet his debts? Perhaps his father-in-law came to live with him or maybe Samuel ( I ) acquired Rogerthorpe by simply marrying the daughter of a previous owner.

The ownership of Rogerthorpe passed to Samuel ( I )'s son Samuel ( II ) who married the daughter of John Flower of Methley. Samuel ( II ) passed the estate on to his son Samuel ( III ) Saltonstal who married the daughter of John Shann also of Methley. Samuel ( III ) was recorded living at Rogerthorpe in 1666 ( the year of the Great Fire of London ). There are records of legal cases involving Saltonstals about tax in 1666 and a dispute in 1602. In November 1995 the name "John Saltonstal" was discovered carved into the stonework on the eastern side of the outer porch of the south facing fire escape doorway.

It is believed that Richard Saltenstall built Huntwick Hall at Streethouse around the same time, a similar house to Rogerthorpe. This hall is now (1999) owned and occupied by the Driffield family, who farm substantial holdings in the area.

The Saltonstal family were living at Rogerthorpe before, during and after the English Civil War which resulted in the execution of Charles I, rise and death through natural causes ( in which malaria played a part ) of Oliver Cromwell and Restoration of Charles II. Their assets were seized by the County Commissioners in 1648 but appear to have been returned intact.

Pontefract Castle was the scene of much action during this time and some of this action spilled over into the Rogerthorpe area. During the second siege a group of Royalist horse soldiers broke out and raided Badsworth which must have then been a Parliamentary camp because on 15 March 1645, 67 Parliamentary prisoners, 130 horses and £1000 in cash were captured from Col Brandling's quarters there.

"Extract from Diary of the Castle at Pontefract, during the second siege for the month of March 1645

The garrison of the castle of Pontefract availed themselves of the opportunity they now enjoyed of providing as ample a supply as possible for future contingencies. They made several excursions, and levied heavy contributions on the surrounding country. They seized the cattle, and laid in a stock of provisions. Necessity, they considered, destroyed the claims of private right; and whatever they could seize, they deemed it proper to take for their own use. The inhabitants of the town and the surrounding country, were alternately exposed to the exactions of the royalists and parliamentarians; and were equally insecure which ever party prevailed.

On the 11th of March, Capt. Laborne and another taking a ride from the castle, towards Wentbridge, and meeting with Mr. Ellis, of Brampton, a great sequestrator, and a quartermaster, took them both and brought them prisoners to the castle. They afterwards made excursions to Turnbridge at Badsworth beyond Ackworth, a small station belonging to the enemy, which they attacked, and took Lieut. Col. Lee, Lieut. Col. Ledger, and three horses.

On the 15th a party went out towards Doncaster, and meeting with Col. Branding's regiment, they routed it and took one major, one lieutenant, and about one hundred horse. Another party, on the same night, paid a second visit to Turnbridge, and plundered the enemy's storehouse of whatever it contained."

One of the two ghost stories associated with Rogerthorpe Manor relates to this time. The ghost of a cavalier is said to have been seen by a visiting Frenchman some years ago. There is also a story which says a Royalist Officer returned home to Rogerthorpe and his little daughter ran out to meet him. She was so excited at seeing her father that she ran in front of his horse and was killed. Another version of this tale says the little girl was run down by the horse of a huntsman and was killed. ( The Badsworth Hunt has been in existence since the C18. Could there be a connection? ). Her Grandmother, who was upstairs, witnessed the accident and rushed to the scene and on the way fell downstairs and broke her neck.

Whatever the truth of the tragic tale the Saltonstals fared better than their neighbours at Badsworth Hall. Robert Dolman, a Royalist, owned Badsworth Hall at the start of the Civil War and were ordered to be sold for treason against the parliament and the people by an Act passed in 1652. These estates were purchased by a very eminent parliamentarian, John Bright, of whom the Saltonstals would probably have been very wary.

John Bright came from Sheffield where his father and he were in the lead trade. At the outbreak of war he allied himself with Parliament and rose to great eminence becoming an acquaintance of Cromwell himself and taking part in many of his battles. In 1660, however, John Bright was so active in helping to bring about the restoration of Charles II that he was knighted for his pains and became Sir John Bright. His tomb can be seen in Badsworth Church. ( One of his descendants was Dr Bright of Bristol after whom "Bright's disease" is named and another Bright descendant oversaw the laying of the transatlantic cable ).

In 1709 Susan Saltonstal married into the Sunderland family and records reveal a Sunderland family living here from 1709 to 1720.

In the late C18 Colonel Edward Rawstorne resided with his family at Rogerthorpe Manor. It is highly likely that he spent some of his time in India because in Badsworth churchyard, just outside of the South door, stands a large pyramid-like tombstone with the following inscription :

"In memory of Osmond Alexander a native from the capital of
Hindustan. He departed this life on 18th July 1788. In years
a stripling, in person handsome, a temper and disposition most
amiable, an honest lad and a faithful servant. This stone is erected
by direction of his master colonel Edward Rawstorne. In memory
of his adoration and regard".
In St Anne's Chapel ( once known as the Rogerthorpe Chapel ) in Badsworth
church is another memorial that reads :

"To the memory of Elizabeth Jane Rawstorne daughter of Col Edward Rawstorne died August 30 1788 aged 14 years".

The church register gives cause of death of Osmond as "Decline" and Elizabeth as "Consumption". It also gives Osmond's age as about 14. Were they friends in India? Obviously Osmond was very highly regarded.

( In the last century, and early this, the children of the area believed that if you ran seven times around Osmond Alexander's tomb he would appear. Apparently the most anyone did was six circuits before discretion took the better part of valour. )

Perhaps it is no coincidence that the Rector of Badsworth at this time was Rev William Rawstorne. He died in 1790 having been Rector of Badsworth for 52 years. His memorial too is in St Anne's Chapel.

Mrs Kitchingham is recorded as the owner in 1816. The Kitchingham family came from Carlton Husthwaite and Leeds. They bought the adjoining Manor of Upton in 1688. Rogerthorpe and half the manor at Upton was then inherited from the Kitchinghams by Charles Oxley of Ripon.

The tenancy of Rogerthorpe Manor ( described as a farmhouse in 1822 ) passed to Roger and Mary Mason. Roger died aged 60, on 5th December1793 "of inflammation of the bowel" and his wife Mary died, aged 82, on 30 December 1831. Both are buried and commemorated in St Anne's chapel in Badsworth church. Roger and Mary had one child, a daughter named Sarah who was born in 1775.

Sarah Mason married Joshua ( I ) Hepworth and they in turn resided at the Manor house. They had two sons, John Mason Hepworth and Joshua ( II ). Joshua ( II ) was born in December 1801 and John Mason at some time before.

About this period Rogerthorpe's next reputed ghost appeared. It is said to be the spectre of a pale faced child dressed in Victorian clothes who has been seen and heard rattling doors in the Manor house.

Joshua ( I ) went to live in Ackworth where he died in January 1834 leaving his two sons John and Joshua ( II ) at Rogerthorpe.

In 1838 John left Rogerthorpe for Eden Place in Ackworth ( possibly after marrying Sarah, the daughter of Smith and Sarah Newall of Littleborough, Lancashire ) leaving his younger brother, Joshua ( II ) at the Manor. John later purchased Ackworth House in 1865 and let off Eden Place. Joshua ( II ) was later to spend his last years, presumably as a widower, in John's old house at Eden Place. It was here that Joshua ( II ) died, childless, early in 1879.

Joshua ( II ) married Sarah Cope Allott the daughter of Rev George Allott, the vicar of South Kirby. He took an active part in Badswoth parish affairs. In his twenties Joshua (II) was a trustee of the Badsworth Church Estate. This source of church income was financed by rents from land left specifically for the purpose of helping to maintain the churchyard, walls, gates and fabric of the church itself ( with the exclusion of the chancel which was traditionally the responsibility of the Rector. ) In the middle of the C19 he purchased much land in Thorpe Audlin.

In the 1851 Census, when he was 49, Joshua ( II ) Hepworth farmed a total of 270 acres and employed 9 labourers, a groom and 3 female house servants. By 1861 his farm had increased to 300 acres and he employed 8 men and 2 servants on the land as well as a groom, cook and dairymaid.

Joshua Hepworth's personal account book still survives in the John Goodchild Collection in Wakefield. Amongst other things it records that William Pease, a Pontefract joiner, undertaker, decorator ( and mineral water manufacturer! ) painted a room white and grey in 1869 and in 1870 papered much of the rest of the house.

Both John and Joshua ( II ) died in 1879, Joshua ( II ) predeceasing his brother. Joshua (II) left a personal estate of £6000, £100 of which was to go to his successor, William Brackenridge, at Rogerthorpe Manor.

William Brackenridge remained at Rogerthorpe Manor for only a few years and the tenancy passed to Lt Col Ramsden who moved here from Park Hill at Wetherby in the 1880s. It must obviously have been a good move because the Colonel purchased Rogerthorpe Manor from E. B. Oxley of Ripon in November 1891. The Purchase price was £12,000 for the house, manor and 214 acres. ( This gives a rough price of £50 / acre which accords with the price of Badsworth Hall and Manor purchased by Richard Heywood-Jones in the 1850s ). He ran a model dairy farm at Rogerthorpe.

Lt Col William John Frecheville Ramsden saw the light of day on 22 May 1845 at 39 Belgrave Square, London. He was the 4th son of Capt Henry James Ramsden ( late of the 9th Lancers ) and his mother was Frederica Selina Law, 5th daughter of Lord Ellensborough, Lord Chief Justice of England.

On 28 October 1864 he was commissioned into the Coldstream Guards with whom he served until he retired in May 1883 having risen to the rank of Lt Colonel. During his time with the Guards he was posted to Egypt and fought at the battle of Tel-el-Kebir in 1882. He was awarded The Egypt Medal with the Tel-el-Kebir clasp and the Khedive's medal.

Whilst serving with the army he married Miss Mabel Lindsay, 2nd daughter of Lt General the Hon Sir J. Lindsay MP, KCMG ( Earl of Crawford ) on 13th February 1877. They had no children but Miss Lindsay " who is well known for her good works" resided with them for many years at Rogerthorpe.

After Retirement from the Guards he enlisted as a Captain in the Yorkshire Dragoons ( Yeomanry, the forerunner of the Territorial Army ) in 1889 and served with them until 1892. He re-enlisted as a Major in 14th Battn West Riding Volunteer Regt in August 1917 at the age of 72 ready to defend his homeland in the event of a German invasion.

As well as his farming and military interests he found time to be a member of the Badsworth Hunt ( of which he was Master in 1892 ) and travel in France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain and Belgium. He was member of the Traveller's Club and the Wellington Club in London.

The Colonel also found time for participating in local affairs. He was a Church Warden at Badsworth church for 40 years ( he still held the post at his death ) as well as being one of the oldest magistrates in the Upper Osgoldcross Division having been created a JP in 1878.

His obituary describes him as a "Conservative of the old school" and for 6 years he served as such on the West Riding County Council for Hemsworth Division.

Perhaps he and his wife saw their finest hours during the 1914-18 War.

In September 1914 the following letter was displayed in the village shop at Thorpe Audlin.

"Are there no young men in Thorpe Audlin from the age of 19 who
should rise to take a share in the work of defending England's shores?
Let it not be said that Thorpe Audlin was too poor spirited to give any
of her sons to help ( in the hour of need ) General Lord Roberts and Kitchener's call to arms - Mabel Ramsden the wife of a soldier and
the daughter of a soldier."

So far as could be ascertained at the time there was up to noon Wed ( 2 Sept 1914 ) but one recruit from Thorpe Audlin, Albert Hemming, footman at Rogerthorpe Manor, who had joined the Coldstream Guards. ( Albert Hemming appears on the War Memorial in Badsworth Church. He was killed in France on 25th January 1915 ).

The replacement footman was A.E. Hirst who was too old to serve in the Army but his son, Horace, enlisted also in the Coldstream Guards. Thankfully he survived the war.

The Colonel's chauffeur was less fortunate. Joe Dent lost his son John Henry at Hooge in the Ypres salient during 1915 whilst serving with the 2nd Battn Yorks and Lanc. Henry, as he was known locally, has no known grave but name is recorded on the Menin Gate in Ypres.

Apart from exhorting the local male population to enlist both Colonel and Mrs Ramsden contributed practically to the war effort. Mrs Ramsden organised knitting and sewing groups in Thorpe Audlin supplying such items as sandbags and articles of clothing for the troops. The effort must have been considerable because she received a letter of thanks acknowledging the 500 articles of clothing that had been received by October 1914. She also organised letters and parcels to Sgt Allan Marshall from Thorpe Audlin who was a prisoner of war in Germany.

Colonel Ramsden assisted with local military training and served on the appeals panel for those requesting exemption from call up. He obviously took his duties seriously.

Early in 1916 Arthur Eyre, a tailor of Thorpe Audlin, appealed against the call up of one of his sons saying all his sons were in the army and this was the last one at home. If this 26 year old son was to go his business would fold. The appeal was successful. In April 1916 Colonel Marsden made a counter appeal saying he had seen the son in question following the Badsworth Hunt on a bicycle and at another time helping a local farmer therefore his contribution to the tailoring trade could not have been that essential. The appeals panel agreed with the Colonel. Young Eyre was told he had three months in which to help his father sort out the business and then report for Army duty. He survived the war but another young Eyre was not so lucky.

Colonel Ramsden also played his part in keeping the Badsworth Hunt together so that it would still be in existence for the troops to return to after the war. The current Master, Capt Foster, was then away at the front with the Linconshire Cavalry.

The Colonel died on 7th January 1927 at the age of 81 after having been seriously ill for a fortnight.

His funeral took place at Badsworth on Tuesday 12 Jan 1927. It was a simple affair. The coffin was brought from Rogerthorpe Manor on a farm wagon preceded by a posse of policeman led by Superintendent Fairbairn and Inspector Elliot. The bearers were 3 sergeants and 3 company sergeant majors from 1st Bttn Coldstream Guards. These soldiers had come from London for the event under the command of Lt Col Tollemach.

The mourners followed behind the cart. The chief mourners were his 3 nephews Capt. F. Ramsden, Col Ramsden Joddrell CMG and Col Josalyn Ramsden. Miss Lindsay, Major Brown Lindsay DSO, MC and the Rev J.J. Antrobus were also present.

The service, which was choral, was conducted by Rector D.W. Maclagan. The lesson was read by Rev J.J. Antrobus a cousin of the Colonel's. The choir and Badsworth Choral Society sang "The King of love" and "For all the saints". The coffin was carried down the aisle to the strains of Nunc Dimittis played by the organist, Mr Waring.

In June 1928 Mabel Ramsden died and in August Rogerthorpe Manor House, estate and Furnishings which had been left to Colonel Ramsden's nephew, Lt Col Josslyn Vere Ramsden, were sold by auction this was completed on 1st October 1928 with Rogerthorpe Manor Farm with 77.716 acres and “The Manor House and its immediate surroundings of 3.598 acres was purchased by Joyce Ethelin, the wife of John Ralph Patientius Warde-Aldam of Frickley Hall, Doncaster. The Walde-Adams continued to live at Frickley Hall but the next resident at Rogerthorpe was Mrs P.S. Nevile. She lived there until some time after 1936.

Mrs Nevile is remembered in Badsworth for allowing her car, driven by her chauffeur Mr Watson, who was also the gardener at Rogerthorpe Manor, to be used once a year to help transport young members of the choir to Scarborough on their annual treat. It is believed his son Billy Watson still lives in the area. ( the other car used for this treat belonged to the two Miss Heywood-Jones who lived in Badsworth Grange. Their chauffeur was Mr Gray. ) She regularly attended Badsworth parish church, arriving by car, always sat directly under the pulpit and put half a crown ( a considerable sum of money then ) in the collection plate.

On 9th February 1943 the ownership of Rogerthorpe Manor and its 3.598 acres passed to Frank Bramley Jackson, a company director of Jackson's Glassworks on Jackson's Lane in Knottingley. ( By coincidence Mr Birdsall, the present owner of Rogerthorpe, also lived in a house which had also been owned by Mr Jackson )

On 4th January 1944 Jackson had bought the small field of 1 acre and one rood, between the road and the field footpath to Badsworth opposite Rogerthorpe Manor from Minerva Annie Shepperd of Redhill, Castleford the occupant of which was Percy Seal.

On 12th January 1944 Rogerthorpe Manor Farm and its surrounding 77.716 acres passed to Frank Bramley Jackson from owners John Batty Calkeld, of Road Avenue, Blackpool, J.P. and retired Bank Manager; Alexandre Orr Bruce, Raikes Parade, Blackpool, Physician and Surgeon; and Ezra Taylor, “Acacia”, Lumley Street, Castleford, J.P. and retired licensed victualler.

On 29/06/45 Jackson purchased 19 acres and 16 perches from George & Bessie Barker (farmers) Moorhouse Farm, Badsworth. This was on the opposite side of Thorpe Lane to the Manor and was to the east of Owlens Lane and mainly to the west of Barrs Drain, up to the Junction with Fairfield Lane. The plan shows a couple of cottages at Thorpe Gate.

There is a local rumour that "Lord Haw Haw" who broadcast for the Nazi's during World War 2 was somehow linked with Rogerthorpe. Until there is some documentary evidence for this it remains simply a rumour.

" On 20/1/1955 19 acres of the Manor Farm was sold to Mr Frank Brabbs for £750. On 24/2/1955 Rogerthorpe Manor Farm and its immediate land of 77 acres, was sold to Frank Brabbs for £3250 on the same date the Manor House was sold to Stanley Tinsdale.

22nd March 1955 was a turning point in the Manor's history. The house was purchased from Mr Jackson by Mr Stanley Whittaker Tinsdale, who at the time of the sale was living in Harrogate. Mr Tinsdale was caterer who has previously managed "The Black Bull" at Dewsbury, and been at the Owl at Hambleton and Monk Fryston Hall. He, assisted by his wife Dorothy, turned the Manor into a somewhat exclusive, members only, country club.

The Country Club at Rogerthorpe Manor had at one time a waiting list of two years for people to join as members and those who were members had the exclusive "task" of taking as guests, those who wanted to be members, but who were on the waiting list. Many influential political and business people of the area were members. Lord King of British Airways was a member and kept his horses in the stables adjoining the Manor. Anyone knowing the names of other noteable greats, who were members or any anecdotable accounts of events of the time, please write and we will include their names and stories in the next print.

On 3rd March 1956 Tinsdale released a mortgage on Monk Fryston Hall to Charles Hartley Johnson and Francis Lillian Johnson of Twyzell Lodge, Shankhill, County Dublin and on 7th March was recorded as transferring a property in Hambleton, probably the “Owl”.

On the demise of Mr Tinsdale on 29th August 1959 his widow Dorothy inherited the business. The Will leaving everything to his wife had been drawn on 28th February 1957, probate was entered on 17th February 1960 and finalised 21st March 1960. She, along with John Asquith, set up in business as co-directors of Rogerthorpe Manor Ltd. 13 years later Mrs Tinsdale retired and sold the Manor to Mr and Mrs Buchanan.

In August 1972 Mr and Mrs Kenneth Custance Buchanan took control of the Manor and were to remain there for 11 years. They altered the nature of the establishment slightly in 1982 by opening the club to non-members. There was some confusion at the time because notification of this alteration for license purposes had been issued to Badsworth Parish Council when, in fact, Rogerthorpe is in the jurisdiction of Thorpe Audlin. 1983 saw Rogerthorpe on the market again and, after its sale, Mrs Buchanan moved to the Yorkshire coast.

In 1983 the Manor was purchased by Minsterchoice Ltd. This company was formed in 1976 by Stephen Suart, a Castleford business man, and his wife. Their first restaurant was "The Blacksmith's Arms" at Biggin which they opened in 1977. They were joined at Rogerthorpe by Noel and Muriel Martin. The Martins had had considerable experience in the catering industry in France and Switzerland, according to the publicity of the time, but believed British food to be amongst the best in the world. Their aim was to make Rogerthorpe no longer a country club but a country house inn which hopefully would serve the social needs of the surrounding area. Young people were encouraged to frequent the establishment by making sure their "prices were not prohibitive." There was a live band but no electronic equipment or a juke box. The Manor was redecorated, the walls having been painted in Adam green and the classic ceilings restored to a fresh colour. Soft furnishings were replaced in an attempt to reflect the period of the house.

In March 1987 Rogerthorpe Manor was once again for sale and this time it was purchased by Melvyn and Caroline Wallis from London. Mrs Wallis knew the area from childhood having members of her family living in Ackworth. The rural surroundings of Rogerthorpe were an added attraction especially for their young family. Mrs Wallis is especially remembered for her cake decorating skills examples of which were photographed for national magazines. Their stay here was to be short. Despite the Wallis's valiant efforts the Manor went into receivership in 1989. ( Mr Birdsall, the current owner, made an unsuccessful bid to purchase Rogerthorpe at this time. )

The next owners were the Wharfe family from Sharlston who took possession in January 1990. Melvyn Wharfe was a property developer and his wife, Anne, was the licensee. they were totally determined that their daughter Joanne should have her wedding reception there. Mrs Wharfe had been taken to Rogerthorpe as a young girl by her parents and had always held it in great affection. They felt that Rogerthorpe had been neglected during the 80s and implied that when they purchased the establishment it was just another somewhat run down public house. From January to June 1990 extensive restorations were carried out including exposing the fine oak ceiling above the bar which had been hidden for years behind "ugly plaster." This restoration may have been too enthusiastically undertaken.

In January 1991 a planning sub-committee of the Wakefield Council heard that when one of their officers went to see what alterations were proposed he was surprised to see they had already been carried out. The officer told the committee he was concerned about removal of fireplaces, alterations to a stairwell, treatment of kitchens and two bedroom ceilings and nearby corridor, extension of one bedroom and roofing over the central courtyard as well as the new opening to the reception area. He had explained that it would be necessary to undo what had been done but "the owner showed no inclination to alter already completed work". The report added that the work had adversely affected a listed building. The Counsellors refused planning and gave authority for action to be taken to rectify the unauthorised development. Rogerthorpe Manor passes eventually into the hands of the receivers, Touche Ross of Leeds, who put it on the market in 1992.
1992 saw Rogerthorpe Manor acquired by its current ( December 1995 ) owner Parkside Innes and Leisure ( Isle of Man ) Ltd owned by Charles Birdsall who, as mentioned above, had attempted to purchase the establishment three years earlier. Mr. Birdsall and his Fiancee Tina Clough set about organising the recruitment of good staff, quality, service and marketing; together with an extensive long term plan of rolling refurbishment, then added expansion through additional new extension works, that were required to put Rogerthorpe back on it's path to success.

During 1992 and 1993 much work was performed landscaping the grounds and restoring the derelict area to the rear of the Manor. In 1994 and 1995 extensive interior work was carried out. The public and working areas were almost entirely refurbished and a recent death watch beetle infestation in the roofs was eradicated.

Extensive advertising and marketing, backed up by excellent service, has made the hotel enormously popular for weddings, accommodation, conferences and banquets. It has recently acquired a licence to perform wedding ceremonies on site.

As well as the "Murder Mystery Dinners" a new innovation is a "Ghost and Ghoulies Dinner" at which ghost stories of the Manor are told and "Ghosts" appear!

A new traditional village, Jacobean Style, pub was built onto the Manor. Completion was November 1997. This will cater for everyone in Badsworth and the locality who like to drink traditional ales in a traditional pub atmosphere ( which we enjoyed prior to the current style of upholstered eateries. ), and for residents who like a good pub atmosphere.

The Majority of the Roof of the original Manor buildings was removed in summer 1998 and re-fixed again after replacing broken or worn laths and slates. During February – March 1999 all the rest of the Roofs were completed on Refurbishment at a cost of excess of £40,000. This will ensure the protection of the structure from weather for another 400 years!!!

Writing on the 'roof' Rogerthorpe Manor

During Roof re-furbishments in summer 1998 a hatch in the roof was opened and on the back were the names of various workmen who had been there in this century. The list was: - (if anyone knows them)
· Harry Dent 1911
· Gellis Harrop 1914
· W. Graham 1914
· Bob Jackson 1920
· A. Roberts Goole 1925
· L. Barf Pontefract 1925
· G. Wilson 1931
· S. Baker 1931
· EH and L. Wastow 1933
· J.H/ Dickinson 1934
· T.Riley 1961

The Marquee was dismantled and sold in late 1997.

Ten more bedrooms and three conference rooms, together with a doubling of the Banqueting Room were to take place in 1998. After eight months of delays in 1998 by the Wakefield Council, the amended Planning Applications were refused. The matter went to appeal and alternative plans were also submitted, as well as the Reserved Matters entered for the Existing Outline Planning Permission (The reserved matters were approved on 26th March 1999 together with approval for the widening of the access). Car parking had already been extended.

The appeal was won 1st April 1999 and building works started by the end of that month, target date for completion December 1999, just in time for the Millennium. The specification required by the WMDC for the building was strong enough to carry the "Flying Scotsman" over the Firth of Forth. The foundation pads for the steel frame, which was put up in the second week in May, contained 280 tonnes of concrete and the steel floor beams for the first floor were one metre in depth. The resultant cost was enormous. The refusal of the original planning application by Wakefield Metropolitan District Council's planning Committee, against the recommendation for approval by their own professionally trained Planning Officers, caused a twelve month delay in the project, lost the owner hundreds of thousands of pounds of business and denied additional jobs and income for construction and hotel service people in the area during this time. A decision now proved to be unreasonable, made obviously not by a professional judgement, but obviously by personal ones.

During the early part of 1999 the kitchens were refitted with new floorings, stainless steel drains, new fireproof, anti –bacterial wall and ceiling claddings and new stainless steel ovens and equipment. The capacity capability was increased five-fold to cope with the increased demand for food prepared in hygienic, easy clean environment using the latest equipment and cold storage.
Additional cold Wine Storage and an increase in the Wine Cellar capacity was also completed.
Preparations for the Millennium were put in place during early 1999 in terms of logistics, equipment, commemorative individuality customised items and celebratory items. Champagne was acquired and stored and orders put in hand for food items.

The close proximity of Rogerthorpe Manor to the A1, M1 M62 and frequent rail links to London and the North make it an ideal venue for business conferences as well as the meeting place for local organisations such as Rotary Clubs. Places of interest like York, the Yorkshire Dales and Derbyshire Peak District are within easy travelling distance. This combined with a peaceful rural setting also make Rogerthorpe an ideal tourist centre.

In May 2004 Charles & Tina Birdsall sold the Hotel to move on to fresh challenges, but also to spend more time with their Children and Grand Children. The Family home was extensively redeveloped to provide a focal point for Family gatherings and Grand Children to play.

Useful article before a Christmas?

Christmas breakfast from the past possibly eaten at Rogerthorpe Manor!

In this area during the first half of the 19th Century, and probably very much earlier, it was customary to eat a kind of porridge called “Frumatty” during the Christmas period. (“Frumatty” is a corruption of the Latin Frumenti = corn/grain).

Before the Feast of St Thomas the Apostile (21 Dec) it was customary for a member of the family, usually for a child or old person, to beg some wheat-corn from the farmers. Frumatty was only made and eaten between 2 December and Christmas Day and was made thus : -

Put the corn in some water and allow it to soak 15 minutes, drain off the water, put it in a strong bag and beat/roll it vigorously until the husk leaves the grain. Remove the contents from the bag and dry in an oven until the detached husks can be blown away leaving the grain.

Place the grain in a pan of water and boil until it “creases” (a dialect word meaning bursts open). Continue to boil the mixture until it stiffens and it can then be cooled and stored for use.

Put some mixture from the store with milk into a pan and boil whilst continually stirring. (A critical stage, if boiled too long it will spoil, or to use the technical phrase “set on”). A bit of “livening” – flour or oatmeal – is added whist the mixture is boiling. Once thickened to taste it is taken off the boil and sugar or treacle can be added. Sweet pepper, cloves and currants were also sometimes added.

Eat in a bowl like porridge and make sure none is left after Christmas Day!

Jim “Egon” Bolter
2/9/95


EXTRACTS FROM A BRIEF GUIDE TO ST. MARY’S CHURCH
BADSWORTH
by JIM BOLTER
(Relating to Rogerthorpe Manor)

BADSWORTH MANOR AND PARISH

The first record of Badsworth & its church is to be found in the Doomesday book of 1086. We are told the Manor of Badsworth belonged to Ilbert de Lacy of Pontefract and was owned by 2 unnamed brothers and “a church is there and a priest”.
The modern parish is in the diocese of Wakefield although it has spent most of its life in the diocese of York. Currently the parish includes Badsworth, Upton & Thorpe Audlin. At one time Wentbridge too was in the parish.
The church that you see today is probably the third on the site and the bulk of the modern structure dates from about 1350 - 1400 although there is one piece of the earlier church still visible.
Like most medieval churches in this country its main axis is aligned roughly east - west with the tower at the West end and altar at the east. A more precise measurement recently shows the axis to point to 23 degrees north of east which would suggest that a mid summer sunrise alignment was used when the building site was laid out.
The seat of power in the village was Badsworth Hall which no longer exists despite there being a house of that name on Main Street. The present building was the original entrance to the Hall and consisted mostly of stables. The Hall was demolished in the late 1940s. Houses have since been built on the site.
The last Lord of the Manor was Richard Heywood-Jones and his family is much in evidence in the church. Richard himself was killed by lightning whilst he was at camp with the local militia in Harrogate in 1900. He left a widow and daughters. All the daughters married men who had estates in their own right so on the death of his death of his widow in 1926 the Badsworth estate was broken up and auctioned off. It is worth noting that Badsworth Grange, which is still standing on Back Lane, was built for his two unmarried sisters. One of his nephews was Rector of the parish and his brother & sister-in law lived at Elmsall Lodge.
Until fairly recently the Rector lived in “The Old Rectory” on Main Street which was rebuilt, at his own expense, by Rev Willliam Entwistle during his rectorship 1716 - 1732.
Rogerthorpe Manor, now an hotel, was a small estate inside the Badsworth Estate but independent of it. A number of memorials inside the church refer to its past inhabitants.
Despite its smallness the parish and its inhabitants have had their part to play in the history of our nation.

SIR JOHN BRIGHT’S TOMB

John Bright was born in Sheffield in 1619. In May 1642 he protested against Charles I raising forces. He became a Captain & later a Colonel in the Parliamentary army taking part in the battle of Wakefield & served at Selby & the sieges of Pontefract castle. He was appointed Governor of Sheffield, MP for the West Riding in 1654, High Sheriff in 1654. After the death of Cromwell he assisted in restoring Charles II to the Throne in 1660 for which he was created a baronet. He purchased the Manor of Badsworth after Parliament had sequestered it from the Dolman family during the civil war. Sir John died “having languished a year & a half of the stone” on Thursday 13th September 1688.




14th CENTURY TOMBSTONE

On the floor carved in sandstone and very worn. This stone has a cross with clustered terminals & a tiny trefoil at the head centre & flowers or rosettes at the each corner. The sword on the right of the cross shaft suggests it covered a soldier’s grave.


RAMSDEN MEMORIAL

After serving in the army in the Coldstream Guards with whom he fought at the battle of Tel-el-Kebir Col Ramsden settled at Rogerthorpe Manor. Although too old to fight in the 1914 - 18 War he was very active in the war effort in the area. He was a supporter & one time master of the Badsworth Hunt.


ST. ANNE’S CHAPEL

Originally a chantry founded by the Vavasor family who held Badsworth in the 15th century. It later became associated with Rogerthorpe Manor. The present altar & fittings were erected in 1929 in memory of Mrs Heywood-Jones (the widow of Richard) by her daughters.


THE DEVIL’S DOOR (CLOSE TO OSMOND ALEXANDRE’S GRAVESTONE)

The north side of the church and churchyard never receives direct sunlight and medieval superstition associated this with the Devil. Often those considered to be undesirable were buried in this part of the churchyard in the church itself thus the door, which dates from the 13th century, is referred to as “The Devil’s door”.

THE 1914-18 WAR MEMORIAL

Here are recorded the names of those associated with the parish who died in the Great War. There is at least one omission, Harry Taylor, who came from Thorpe Audlin and died in 1914. So far all but three have been traced and are soldiers with the exception of Gordon Sharpe who was serving on HMS Arrogant when he fell overboard and was drowned. The Cutt brothers died on the same day in different parts of the Western Front.


Research into the history of the Manor and its environs is an ongoing process. Anyone having any other contributions to this account is asked to contact the Manor
on 01977 643839

Researched by
Charles L. Birdsall, 1994-1999 Jim Bolter, 1995
John Goodchild, 1995 Roy Wooler, 1994
Gordon Tune, 1997 Peter Freeman. University of Leeds.



EXTRACT FROM CENSUS - RESIDENTS OF ROGERTHORPE MANOR

SURNAME F.NAMES STATUS AGE M STATUS BIRTHPLACE

1851
Hepworth Joseph Head 49 Married Rogerthorpe Hall
Hepworth Sarah Cope Wife 43 Married South Kirby
Allott Mary Visitor
Clergymans widow 68 Widow South Kirby
Harrop John Farm Servant 22 Single Wakefield
Taylor James Groom 21 Single South Elmsall
Mountain William Farm Servant 16 Single Pontefract
Wilkinson Elizabeth House Servant 28 Single South Elmsall
Sanderson Mary House Servant 19 Single Darrington
Lindsay Mary Ann House Servant 18 Single Methley
Occupied 270 acres & employed 9 labourers

1861
Hepworth Joseph Head 59 Married Rogerthorpe Hall
Hepworth Sarah Cope Wife 53 Married South Kirby
Mountain William Farm Servant 26 Single Pontefract
Barnforth Israel Farm Servant 18 Single Kellington
Lodes George Groom 19 Single South Kirby
Wood Mary Cook 52 Single York
Schofield Mary Housemaid 23 Single South Hiendly
Newsome Mary Dairymaid 18 Single South Kirby
Occupied 350 acres & employed 8 men & 2 servants


1891
Ramsden William J F Head 45 Married 39 Belgrave Sq. London
Ramsden Mabel Wife 41 Married 21 Berkley Sq. London
Garness Thomas Butler 30 Single Leconfield, Yorks
Calton Mary Cook 39 Single Hultons Ambo, Yorks
Larkin Susan Lady's maid 31 Single Maidstone, Kent **
Mavin Elizabeth Housemaid 26 Single Embleton, Nthumblnd
Stephenson Mary Kitchen Maid 19 Single Kirk Smeaton, Yorks
Nilson Thomas Footman 18 Single Calton, Yorks
Holt Elizabeth Housemaid 16 Single Uleskelf, Yorks

** Susan Larkin, was Gordons Tunes Grandmother,his father was Oliver Larkin Tune and maried his mother Lily Barker who was born at Walton Farm, ( She died aged 100 years old recently ). Gordon Tunes Father farmed at Dr Nicholsons present house.
(Church Farm) and it was here that the wagon used for Col. Ramsden funeral was borrowed.

SACREMENTALS BADSWORTH PARISH CHURCH from 1838

These records include members of my Huntington and Brewster ancestors.

Date Amount
1839 December 1St by fee from Elizabeth Brewster for Child Christening 6d
[This is for Henry, Elizabeth’s illigitimate son, see family tree]

1840 July 26 by fee from Joseph Huntington at William’s Christening 6d
[Joseph was my Great Great Grandfather and William my Great Grandfather]

1841 October 3 by fee from Thomas Brewster at Child’s Christening 6d
[ After John Simpson Brewster’s Christening]

1842 June 26 by fee from Mary Huntington at Child Christening 6d

1843 April 23 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d
[After their daughter, Sarah’s birth]

1845 May 10 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d

1852 May 4 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d
[After their daughter, Elizabeth’s birth]

1856 May 7 by fee from Elizabeth Huntington for Funeral 4s-0d
[This was for the funeral of Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth [Betty] Huntington,
my Great Great Grandparents. Elizabeth was aged 12.]

1857 November 15 by fee from Fanny Brewster at child Christening £1-2-0d
[After Fanny’s (Junior) Christening, Illegitimate daughter of Mary Brewster.]

1858 December 26 by fee from Thomas Brewster at Child Christening 6d

1861 June 25 by fee from William Huntington & Mary Brewster, Marriage fee
given [2s-0d, see below]. [My Great Grandparents.]

1863 March 24 by fee for Benjamin Brewsters Christening 6d

1869 November 11 to Richard Ellis & Sarah Brewster Marriage 2s-0d
[My Great Grandmother Mary Huntington’s (nee Brewster) sister and
brother-in-law. (see 1843& 1861)]

1872 April 3 to Joseph Huntington’s Burial 2s-0d
[My Great Great Grandfather aged 84, formerly Blacksmith at Thorpe Audlin.]

Note:

There are other Huntingtons recorded eg. George and his wife Alice, formely Skipsey, and their children but I am not certain that they are my relations.








TYTHES AND TAXES for THORPE AUDLIN 1791

page 37

Owner Occupier Close Name Quality Val p/a Annual Amount
Gilbert Smithson John Lapidge £1
John Dixon Joseph Huntington £1
John Dixon Ann Huntington £1


page 39

Gilbert Smithson John Lapidge £1
John Dixon John Huntington £1
John Dixon Ann Huntington £1
------------------------------------ “ -------------------------------

Note; Joseph Huntington was my 3 X great grandfather, Ann Huntington was his mother, and therefore my 4 X Great Grandmother.

COPY of LAST POOR RATE for THORPE AUDLIN made 10th Day of May 1872

Owned by Occupier Quantity Ground Rental Rateable Value at 9d in £
Col’ Wood Thomas Brewster £6-0-9 £8-2-8 £7-14-11 5s-9d-¾d
There is no equivalent of the old farthing (1/4 of a old penny) in present day money


VALUATION LIST for the Parish of Badsworth in the COUNTY of YORK

Summary of Owners names & Quantities also Qualities that each Occupier holds under each respective Owner.


VALUATION LIST for the Parish of BADSWORTH in the COUNTY of YORK

Owner Occupant Quantity G’d Rent Rateable Value
William Whitehead Thomas Brewster £2-3-18 £8-7-5 £7-2-3

1878
Owner Occupant Quantity G’d Rent Rateable Value
Charles Wood Col’ Thomas Brewster £6-0-9 £8-2-8 £7-14-11



INCOME TAX RATE for APRIL 1885

Owned by Occupier Description Situation a.r.p Gross Est R/V Rent
G. Carter Esq Thomas Brewster Fox and Hounds Thorpe A 3s-Od £8-0-0 £6-8-0
Surveyor’s Duty Payable 1885/6
£19-0-0 12s-8d





ACKWORTH POLLING DISTRICT A

Thorpe Audlin

No 549 Brewster Thomas, Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling house, Fox & Hounds Pub.

No 583 Taylor Frederick, Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling House Cottage.
[Frederick Taylor was Mr Brewster’s son-in-law]



VOTING LIST 1891

Thomas Brewster Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling House, Fox & Hounds




HUNTINGTON FAMILY on the CENSUS RETURNS 1841 - 1871

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1841

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 50 Blacksmith not given

Elizabeth (hw) (m) 39 “ “

George (s) 24 “ “

Joseph (s) 13 “ “

Sarah (d) 11 “ “

Ann (d) 8 “ “

William (s) 11 months “ “


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851


NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 59 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Betty (wf) (m) 48 Wales
(near Sheffield)
William (s) 10 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) 9 Thorpe Audlin

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 22 Blacksmith /Journeyman Thorpe Audlin

Hannah (wf) (m) 23 Altofts



CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1861

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 70 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Betty (wf) (m) 59 Wales
(near Sheffield)
William (s) (um) 20 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1871

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 83 Retired Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin [Blind]
Betty (hw) (m) 68 Wales
[Between Rotherham and Sheffield]
______________________”___________________

The BREWSTER FAMILY on the CENSUS RETURNS 1841-1891

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1841

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

BREWSTER

Richard (hd) (m) 55 not given

Hannah (hw) (m) 50 “ “

Hannah (d) 11 “ “

Benjamin (s) 7 “ “

David (s) 4 “ “

Henry (s) 1 [Elizabeth’s illegitimate son] “ “

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 27 “ “

Fanny (hw) (m) 27 “ “

Mary (d) 2 “ “


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 36 Boiler maker Walton Wood

Fanny (wf) (m) 40 Thorpe Audlin

Mary (d) 11 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

John (s) 9 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Sarah (d) 8 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1861

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 46 Labourer Walton Wood

Fanny (wf) (m) 50 Thorpe Audlin

Mary (d) (um) 21 Dressmaker Thorpe Audlin

Sarah (d) (um) 18 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) 10 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (G’d) 3 Thorpe Audlin
[Mary’s illegitimate daughter]


FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE 1871

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 56 Landlord ( Fox & Hounds) Upton

Fanny (wf) (m) 60 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) (um) 19 Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (d) 13 Thorpe Audlin


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1881

FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 66 Publican Badsworth

Fanny (wf) (m) 70 Badsworth

Fanny (g/d) (um) 23 Bar Maid Badsworth

HUNTINGTON

Mary 16 Servant Thorpe Audlin






CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1891

FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (wd) 77 Publican Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (G’d) (um) 33 Housekeeper Thorpe Audlin

HEPWORTH

Mary (vst) (m) 26 [my Grandmother] Thorpe Audlin

Wilfred Charles (vst) 7 months [this should be 7 years] Darrington


CENSUS RETURNS THORPE AUDLIN 1881-1891

TAYLOR FAMILY

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1881

TAYLOR

Frederick (hd) (m) 31 General labourer Saltwood Green
Kent
Elizabeth (wf) (m) 29 [nee Brewster] Badsworth

Frederick I T B (s) 3 Badsworth

Louisa Taylor (d) 2 Badsworth

Frances Eleoner (d) 1 Badsworth

[Their son’s names were Ingram Taylor Brewster Taylor]
[Ingram and Brewster were the surnames of his Grandparents]


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1891

Cottage

TAYLOR

Frederick (hd) (wd) 41 Groom/domestic servant. Saltwood Green

Frederick I T (s) 13 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Lily (d) 12 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Frances E (d) 11 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Richard (s) 9 Scholar Thorpe Audlin


CENSUS RETURNS 1851-1891

WESTERMAN FAMILY

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851


NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

WESTERMAN

Thomas (hd) (m) 23 master Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Mary Ann (wf) (m) 30 Middlesborough

Susarnah (d) 2 ( name as spelt on return) Ackworth

Arthur (s) 5 months Thorpe Audlin

Charles (Neph) (u)21 Blacksmith’s Apprentice Ackworth



BREWSTER FAMILY TREE 1779 - 1861

Katherine Brewster


John
b1-7-1755
at Bubwith Pc

Married 30 March 1779 at Fishlake parish Church
JOHN BRUISTER = ELIZABETH SCALES

Richard
c18-7-1785 at Fishlake

Married 7-5-1809 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
RICHARD BREWSTER = HANNAH BARAM
b4-4-1790
of Darrington Parents Thomas & Elizabeth Baram.
Neither signed of Badsworth ( nee Holt, Father,
Witnesses Fanny Gardiner Roger Holt of North Elmsall)
& James Gardiner

William Richard Thomas Joseph Betty
bn1-8-1809 c4-10-1812 c28-8-1814 c12-5-1816 c5-5-1819
c10-9-1809 m31-5-1836 m9-12-1838 d20-8-1817 Henry
Rebecca Hill c1-12-1839
Ackworth Pc (s/o Betty, single women )


George Emma Hannah Benjamin David
c24-2-1827 c20-10-1829 c18-12-1831 c20-4-1834 c23-4-1837

Married 9-12-1838 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
THOMAS BREWSTER = FANNY MOOR
d8-1-1895 age 80 d11-10-1889 age 79
Buried in Badsworth Parish Church Cemetry


Mary John Simpson Sarah Elizabeth
c30-8-1839 c 15-9-1841 c2-4-1843 c4-8-1851
m11-11-1869 m25-12-1877
Richard Ellis Frederick Taylor
Fanny (d/oMary, single women) Father, Henry, Father, Ingram Taylor
c13-11-1857 Witnesses Witnesses
d26-2-1938 age 80 Jane Taylor & Charles Crossley &
at No8 Shopping Centre, Thurnsco. Mary Huntington Fanny Brewster,
buried in Badsworth Church Cemetry [nee Brewster] [Elizabeth’s, neice.]
[Sarah’s sister].




Married 25-6-1861 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
MARY BREWSTER = WILLIAM HUNTINGTON



TAYLOR FAMILY 1838-1911

Married 9-12-1838 at St Mary’s parish Church, Badsworth
THOMAS BREWSTER = FANNY MOOR

Elizabeth
c4-8-1851
Married 25-12-1877 at St Mary’s Parish Chuch Badsworth
ELIZABETH BREWSTER = FREDERICK TAYLOR
age 26 age 27 Labourer
brd 7-3-1886 age 35 d5-9-1911 age 61
buried in Badsworth Church Cemetry
Father, Thomas Brewster Father, Ingram Taylor
Witnesses, Charles Crossley & Fanny Brewster
[Elizabeth’s, neice.]

Frederick John (Lily) Louisa Frances Eleoner Richard
b1878 c13-4-1879 c11-4-1880 c15-10-1882
c 13-4-1879



In the parish records the mother’s name of Frances Eleoner and Richard is recorded as Sarah, also there is no Lily but a Louisa who was baptised on the same date as Frederick John. He did not have the initials ‘I’ (could it be Ingram) nor the ‘B’ (could it be Brewster) on the Baptismal Register. Did he adopt these names after the death of his mother (formerly Brewster) and his Grandfather Ingram Taylor?




HUNTINGTON FAMILY 1522 - 1884

Henry Huntington =
of Ackworth 1522

Henry Huntington, Junior = Elizabeth
of Ackworth in 1522-24, will proved in 1557
? same as Henry Huntington
of Hesill, who died in 1556

Thomas John = Margaret Robert
curate, then rector died 1571
of Ackworth died 1578


John Huntington John
“my bastered son”


Roger Smithson of Ackworth = ... Huntington
gent. Will (P C York.) 1604;
proved 1605; “ to be buried at
Normanton”; Robt.Cawood a
Witness.

Ann Smithson = Henry Hunt - Thomas Hunt John = Elizabeth ... ?
(and others), ington ington proves of Ackworth, gent.
his brother will dated and
John’s will in proved 1648
1648

? a daughter
married Hy
Ash “brother”
of J.H. in 1648

Thomas Huntington
eldest son.


Henry Huntington
c28-9-1628
at Ackworth

Married 17-4-1654 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
HENRY HUNTINGTON = ELIZABETH DIXON

Henry
date illegible, C1657





Married 28-8-1677 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church , Ackworth
HENRY HUNTINGTON = MARY WATSON

Richard
c18-10-1679

Married c1700 (possibly Ackworth)
RICHARD HUNTINGTON = (wife’ name not found)

Thomas
c8-7-1712

Married 13-12-1748 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
THOMAS HUNTINGTON = ANN CAMPLIN
of Badsworth of Ackworth
d August 1767


Joseph Elizabeth Mary Ann Sarah
c12-11-1749 c22-2-1751 c29-11-1756 c4-3-1759 c?-?-1765
m25-6-1785 m13-5-1788 age 24
John Parker Robert Briggs age 28
Witnesses Neither signed register
Joseph Huntington & Witnesses
Joseph Haigh James Gardener &
Wm Briggs & James Firth

Marriage Banns read 23-7-1772 at St Mary’s parish Church, Badsworth
JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = SARAH LAPEIDGE
c11-6-1755 at Badsworth
[Joseph signed register Sarah didn’t]
Witnesses, Wm Wigglesworth & Thos’ Peat
d14-1-1824 age 74 d17-1-1821 age 66


Thomas Ann Martha Joseph Sarah
bn11-9-1774 bn12-3-1781 bn22-11-1784 bn19-12-1789 bn7-9-1792
c3-10-1774 c17-4-1781 c16-1-1785 c17-1-1790 c18-10-1792
m28-2-1797 d20-3-1806 d02-4-1801 d09-02-1797
Elizabeth age 25 age 16y 5m age 4y 5 months
Boothroyd, consumption decline Ulcerated sore
Kirksmeaton Pc throat

Married 26-7-1813 at St Gile’s Parish Church, Pontefract
JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = MARY CONWAY
of Badsworth of Pontefract
d5-4-1822

George Edward Sarah
c10-10-1816 c5-10-1819 c3-4-1822
d5-4-1822






Married 1-8-1825 at All St’s Parish Church, Wakefield
JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = ELIZABETH PEARSON
(second marriage) b7-3-1803 [village of Wales]
d12-3-1872 age 84 burial 30-03-1880
[at Badsworth Parish Church] aged 73


Mary Joseph Sarah Elizabeth
c21-9-1826 c2-6-1829 c4-7-1830 c20-7-1832
m14-4-1856 m4-6-1848 d12-3-1834
William Donbavand Hannah Addy aged 1yr 8mths
(widower) Normanton P.C.

Ann
c23-3-1843
illigitimate
daughter of Mary

Ann Betsy William Elizabeth
c25-12-1833 b4-12-1836 b26-6-1840 c1-10-1843
d7-8-1837 d7-5-1856
age 9 months aged 12 yrs

Married 25-6-1861 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
WILLIAM HUNTINGTON = MARY BREWSTER
d31-8-1866 aged 25
[killed in the quarry when a large stone fell on him]
[Mary Huntington remarried, see Westerman family]


William Mary Elizabeth
bn?-?-1863 bn17-4-1864 c4-11-1866
m9-2-1883 age 17 spinster
Thomas Hickling,
age 23 Batch, Engine Driver.
John Hickling, Labourer

re-married April/May/June quarter 1870 at ? Church
MARY HUNTINGTON = CHARLES WESTERMAN
AGE 30 [widow] age 20 Batchelor

Married 26-2-1884 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
MARY HUNTINGTON = JAMES HENRY HEPWORTH


The early records of the Huntington family (1522 - 1657) are taken from the book ‘Historical Antiquities of ACKWORTH’ compiled by W.A.GREEN, which was re-issued by Christine Williams - Brown and Ada Pritchard in limited edition of 1989. I have a copy of this publication.











ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

During my research of the many families connected with the Hepworth family I have received advice, assistance, and guidance from many sources. I wish to place on record my gratitude to the following without whom none of this geneology or history could have been researched and written. Any discrepancy in the text, false dates, names or information are my responsibility.

I have a special thank you to express to my late wife Syvia who began it all, and to my children and other members of my family who have shown their interest in my efforts and so encouraged me. If there are others who have helped me but whom I have failed to acknowledge I would ask for their understanding.

The staff of all the following places have been courteous, understanding and patient with my many enquiries and problems.

Local History Department; Reference Department, both of
Huddersfield, Kirklees Library Services.
Local History Department, Wakefield Central Library, Baln Lane, Wakefield.
Leeds City Library, Leeds
West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield
West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds
Yorkshire Archeological Society, Leeds
Registrar’s Offices; Huddersfield, Wakefield, Pontefract, Doncaster
Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, York.
Huddersfield Family History Society
Doncaster Family History Society
Wakefield Family History Society
The incumbants of the Anglican Churches whom I have contacted.
The many Family Historians whom I have contacted during my research, who are too numerous to mention individually.
Quotations are taken from the following authors book’s;
“The Historical Antiquities of Ackworth”, compiled by W.A.Green, re-issued
1989 by Christine Williams-Brown B.A., A.L.A and Ada Pritchard
For Information on Joseph Huntington; The John Goodchild Collection. Local History Study Centre, below Central Library, Wakefield.
And to Staff of Rogerthorpe Manor for their assistance.

Gordon Hepworth
Family Historian

ROGERTHORPE MANOR FIELDS NAMES AT TIME OF SALE TO COL. RAMSDEN 1891
Ex 1891 Deed of Sale

NO FIELD NAME AREA CULTIVATION
Acres Roods Perches
1 Halliwell Ing 1 1 34 Grass
2 Dam Flatt 20 1 27 Grass
3 Six Acres 5 3 14 Grass
4 Seven Acres 7 2 13 Arable
5 Low Quarry
or Quarrell Close 6 2 11 Grass
6 Upper Quarry
or Quarrell Close 13 0 18 Arable
7 Deadman's Row 18 0 14 Grass
8 Low Deadman's Row 7 3 27 Grass
NO FIELD NAME AREA CULTIVATION
Acres Roods Perches
9 Far Foxholes 10 2 17 Grass
10 Near Foxholes 8 3 35 Arable
11 Ten Acres 8 2 36 Arable
12 Part of Twenty Acres 10 3 28 Arable
13 Part of Twenty Acres 8 1 17 Grass
14 Eight Acres
or Little Foxholes 8 2 31 Arable
14a Plantation 0 1 6 Plantation
15 High Thackham 14 0 11 Arable
16 Middle Field ( part of ) 11 1 6 Arable
16a Plantation ( formerly part
of Thorpe Common Close ) 0 0 4 Plantation
17 Thorpe Common Close
( part of ) 8 1 2 Arable
18 Thorpe Common Close
( part of ) 11 2 9 Arable
19 Great Ing otherwise
Crutt Close 14 2 11 Grass


20 Paddock otherwise 6 acres
formerly part of Middle Field 6 1 20 Grass
21 Paddock 1 1 8 Grass
22 Paddock 2 2 16 Grass
23 Stack Yard 1 1 25 Grass
24 Willow Garth & Plantation 0 1 28 Plantation
25 Immediate surrounds
of Manor 2 3 36 Garden etc
26 Orchard 1 0 14 Grass
27 Road 0 0 20 Grass
28 Road 0 1 11 Bridle Road
TOTAL IN THORPE AUDLIN 213 3 29
29 Bridle Road
( in Badsworth Township ) 3 20 Grass
30 Field
( in Badsworth Township ) 1 1 6 Grass
TOTAL IN BADSWORTH 2 0 26
OVERALL TOTAL 216 0 15


ROGERTHORPE MANOR FIELD NAMES IN TIME OF JOSHUA HEPWORTH

Ex 1891 Deed of Sales
FIELD NAME AREA
Acres Roods Perches
Dan Flatt 26 1 25
Little Quarry Close 6 0 1
Little Quarry Close 5 3 28
Little Quarry Close 3 3 24
Great Quarry & 5 Acres 11 2 36
Upper 10 Acres 9 2 2
Deadman's Row 15 2 3
Low Deadman's Row 7 3 8
Foxhole Close & Low 10 Acres 18 3 38
Middle 20 Acres & part of 20 Acres 17 1 14
20 Acres 10 0 31
Top Thackhams 14 1 15
Middle Field 21 0 25
Little Quarry Close 5 3 11
Orchard 1 0 17
Ing 3 0 22
Immediate surrounds of Manor 1 3 24
Stack Yard 1 2 31
Crutt Close 15 0 3
Willow Garth 0 0 39
Common Allotment 13 2 35


TOTAL IN THORPE AUDLIN
TOWNSHIP 211 2 12

TOTAL IN BADSWORTH
TOWNSHIP 2 1 0

ALL IN BADSWORTH PARISH 213 3 12

It is also noted that Middle Field is mentioned (Rogerthorpe Census) which is reputedly the origin of the surname Midgley, what are the origins of this field ? It appears to have some early significance in early Anglian settlement.





Badsworth Parish Magazine Nov 1906

The Fitzwilliam Trust

This is a new name in the Parish, so we must explain ourselves. There has for many years been a doubt as to the ownership of the building now occupied by the Reading Room and by Mr Tyne. It has been supposed to belong to the Rector, but on research being made it has been discovered that is belonged to Earl Fitzwilliam, whose ancestor owned, in former times, the Badsworth Estate. Lord Fitzwilliam has kindly made over this property, for the good of the parish, to Trustees, the present Trustees being *Mrs Heywood-Jones, the Rev. H. Bright, Lieut.-Colonel Johnston and Lieut.-Colonel Ramsden. The property is to be managed by a Committee consisting of the present Trustees, and by the persons who for the time being hold the offices of Rector of Badsworth and Rector's Churchwarden, and *the owners for the time being of Badsworth Hall and Rogerthorpe Manor. The building now used as a Reading Room may be used by the Trustees as Reading Room, Parish Hall, or for certain other parochial purposes. The dwelling house adjoining the Reading Room is to form an endowment, which after paying for repairs, etc, is to provide books for deserving scholars of the parish, or for pupil teachers attending either a Secondary School, Pupil Teachers' Centre or University.


We hope that this new Trust will in the first place secure our present Reading Room for its present excellent purposes for many years to come, and also will be of the greatest possible benefit in enabling boys and girls of the parish to continue their education with lessened expense to their parents.


The very considerable legal expenses in securing this property to the parish have been entirely borne by *Mr Bright, to whom the parish owes once more a great debt of gratitude for this, as also for the long and careful research which brought to light the ownership of the property. The cottage occupied by the Rectory gardener has been made over by Earl Fitzwilliam to the Rector of the parish.

*Persons mentioned in Rogerthorpe History


Badsworth and District Cow Club
Balance Sheet for Year Ending October 1st, 1906

1905 Dr £ s d
Balance 99 12 7
Nov 18 by cash Assessment 4 2 3
21 " Donation, Mr T Walker 2 0 0
1906
Jan 1 " Bank Interest 2 9 6
April 14 " Assessment 4 12 9
May 19 " Carcase of Cow 0 12 0
April 2 " Subscription, Mr B Tyne 0 2 6
" 11 " Donation, Rev H.Bright 0 5 0
" 11 " Sub. Col. & Mrs Ramsden 2 0 0
Aug 3 " New Entry 0 6 0
Sept 29/ Oct 1 " Assessment 3 10 9 ------------ £119 134
------------

1906 Cr £ s d
Jan by cash Turner, Printer 0 5 6
1905
Nov " Mr. T Walker, Cow 8 0 0
1906
Jan 15 " Use of School 0 1 6
May 19 " Mr Burkitt, Cow 12 0 0
" 19 " Mr T. Walker, Cow 6 0 0
" 19 " Cheque Book 0 1 0
Oct 1 " Manager's remuneration 4 15 0
" 1 " Stationary Etc 0 2 0
" 1 " 1/2 Vets Fee, Mr Tune's Cow 0 15 3 ( Gordon Tune's grandfather )
" 1 " " " " Mr Walker's Cow 0 14 6
Balance 86 18 7
------------ £119 13 4
------------
Signed *W.J.F. Ramsden, October 1st, 1906

Beginning Monday, November 19th, and continuing on the four succeeding Mondays, Mr R.W. Haydon, of the Department of Agriculture the University, Leeds, will give a Course of Lectures in the Schoolroom on ' Dairy Farming' The lectures will begin at 7pm, and will be free to all. It is earnestly hoped that all interested in the subject will make a point of being present. Mr Haydon is a well known practical lecturer, and is sure to make the subject thoroughly interesting.

































A History of Thorpe Audlin
Researched by
Mr. G. Hepworth, 34, Fearn Lea Flats, Lindley,
Huddersfield, HD3 3LF. Tel 01484 308728.

My interest in Thorpe Audlin began with my Grandmother Mary Hepworth, she died in 1944 having lived in Ackworth from 1870. She was formally Mary Huntington, born at Thorpe Audlin on the 17th of April 1864. Her parents were William and Mary Huntington.

There was no Church or school at Thorpe Audlin. It had a pub called the Fox and Hounds. The area was and still is a mainly rural one. Now, in 1995, the hamlet in which my Grandmother was born and spent the first few years of her life is no longer in existence. When I visited the area during the summer of 1996 there was a sign pointing to the Old Village of Thorpe Audlin. On arriving at the place indicated I found that most of the old village had been knocked down except for the Manor House. All that remains to indicate that there ever was a village are some bricked up windows and doors in the outer walls of gardens to the modern houses. The area is known as Thorpe Manor.

Why did an apparently thriving village lose it’s population and businesses to such an extent that it has completely disappeared? A new village has been built on the main road through what is now Thorpe Audlin.

The population had been in decline for some-time. By 1897 the population had decreased to 252 and by 1911 to 245. However, during and before Grandmother’s time things had been very different. The population was 355 in the early part of the nineteenth century. At that time there was a Blacksmith’s shop worked by Joseph Huntington, (my Great Great Grandfather), and his son George. William Dean was a teasle dealer, Thomas Eyer and William Waistnendge were tailors, William Hill and George Smith were wheelwrights, John Sefton and John Scholey, shoemakers, John Sharply had a beerhouse. Farmers in the village were: Richard Harrison, William Lee, John Moor, William Simpson, John Slater, Elizabeth Smith, Joseph Smith, John Terry, Thomas Whitehead, and James Wilton. John Fletcher was the victualler at the Fox and Hounds public house. Joshua Hepworth Esquire, was living in Roger Thorpe Hall. (Kelly’s Directory for 1838)

Twenty years later the hamlet is described in Kelly’s Directory for 1857 as a village and township, 4 miles south of Pontefract, and 1 mile north from Badsworth church. It has in it’s township, including the Rogerthorpe Hall estate, 1,259 acres, and a population in 1851 was 315. Joshua Hepworth Esquire, was living at Rogerthorpe hall. Mrs Smith at the Old Manor House. Colonel Cholmley and Charles Waine, esquires are the ‘chief land owners’. James Cutt, Thomas Carter, John Slater, Terry Williams, George Smith, William Whitehead and a person by the name of Jackson were farmers. William Hill was a Wheelwright and Terry Edwards was a Wheelwright and Joiner. There were two Blacksmiths, Thomas Westerman, and Joseph Huntington. There were two shoe makers, George Huntington, who I believe was Joseph’s son, and Edward Sykes who was also a shopkeeper. George Castle was a cowkeeper. The tailor in the village was Thomas Eyer. When Joseph’s fourth son William married Mary Brewster on the 25th June 1861 at Badsworth parish Church he could not write his name in the register and had to make his mark X, although Mary did so. Of course education was not compulsory. The legislation of the National Education act of 1838 had not made education compulsory but was only a guide to the education of children.

William started work with his father Joseph in the Blacksmith’s shop probably about 1852 but was a farm labourer at the time of my Grandmother Mary’s birth in 1864. Grandmother being their second child, a son William having been born in 1863 at Wentworth.

His wife, formally, Mary Brewster was baptised on the 30th of August 1839 the eldest daughter of Thomas and Fanny Brewster. Thomas, was a helper at the kennels, probably the Badsworth Hunt kennels. When she was 19 years old Mary had a daughter, to whom she gave her mother’s name, Fanny. When she married she did not take her daughter with her which may seem a harsh thing to do but that is what happened. Fanny Junior, is never recorded on the Census returns as living with William and Mary Huntington, but always with her Grandparents the Brewsters at the Fox & Hounds pub.

At this period the ages of the people marrying were often not put on the marriage records. Certificates blandly stated that the people were of “full age”. This could mean any age from 21 upwards. Inspite of the fact that the rector wrote “of full age” on the entry of William and Fanny’s marriage. He was born and baptised on the 26th of June 1840. Such a quick Christening sometimes indicated that the child was not expected to live and as an unbaptised child could not be buried in consecrated ground it was necessary for the child to be baptised as soon as possible.

Christenings, marriages and burials of persons living in Thorpe Audlin were at the local parish church of St Mary’s, Badsworth. I have not found my Grandmother Mary’s baptism there but her younger sister Elizabeth was baptised on the 4th of November 1866. In the records it is recorded that her father was William Huntington (deceased). Unfortunately for William, Mary and Elizabeth, they were never to know their father because he was killed in a quarry when a large stone fell on him. This was on the 1st of August 1866, he was 26 years old. He is not buried at Badsworth as far as I have been able to ascertain, there is no record of his burial at St Mary’s. There was a coroners report on his death but it has not survived the years.
How Mary and her three young children lived after the sudden death of William I’m not sure. They would have to live as best they could. The only form of help for them would be the Poor Law Act. perhaps she appealed to the Board of Guardians who administered the Poor Law Act of 1834. If it was agreed by them that she qualified for “Outdoor Relief”, then she may be given some small amount of money towards the keep of herself and the three children.

As I was researching this possibility I learned that my Great Great Grandmother Betty Huntington, widow of Joseph, did receive “Outdoor Relief”: She was paid 2/6 (12½p 1997) for relief after she was widowed. This continued until at least 1878. The Thorpe Audlin area came under the Hemsworth Poor Law Union.


HEMSWORTH DISTRICT UNION
POOR LAW ORDER BOOK
POOR LAW PAYMENTS

(The following are payments received by my Great Great Grandmother, Betty Huntington, widow of Joseph, from the Poor Law Guardians in the Hemsworth District Union).

Name of Applicant Date Where Resident Amount For what order
allowed
Huntington Betty 26-06-1873 Thorpe Audlin 2/6d 2 weeks
Huntington Betty 02-10-1873 Thorpe Audlin 2/6d 2 weeks
Huntington Betty 24-12-1873 Thorpe Audlin 2/6d 2 weeks
Huntington Betty 28-05-1874 Thorpe Audlin Wine = 3/-
Huntington Betty 01-10-1874 Thorpe Audlin 2/6d months
Huntington Betty 07-01-1875 Thorpe Audlin 3/-+ By other order of Board

The same amount was paid to her every six months from this date until 11th October 1877 when it was reduced to 2/-. No reason for this reduction is in the book. Why should they give her wine on the 28th of May 1874?. The last entry is for:
Huntington Betty 11-04-1878 Thorpe Audlin 2/1.

It is possible then that Mary too received “Outdoor Relief” but the Guardian’s book for the years when she would be claiming has been lost. Despite the difference in the value of money and what it would buy, I think it can be seen from these amounts that it certainly wouldn’t be enough to feed and clothe a family of mother and three children. Happily Mary’s widowhood did not prevail too long, although the four years it did so must have been an anxious and worrying time for her. She married Charles Westerman, aged twenty, ten years her junior. He was a tailor in Ackworth. They married in the April quarter of 1870 and registered their marriage at Hemsworth. Thomas’s Uncle is recorded in White’s Directory of 1857 as Blacksmith at Thorpe Audlin.

My Great Great Grandfather, Joseph Huntington, listed in Kelly’s Directory of 1838 and 1857 as the Blacksmith at Thorpe Audlin, was the son of Joseph Huntington. Information which I have received from Mr John Goodchild from the Goodchild Trust in Wakefield, states that Joseph Huntington, is listed in the 1861 ratebooks as “a tenant under James Dixon of a house and small garden of only nine perches in area and with a rental of 38s.6d.

The position of the blacksmith’s shop is recorded on the plans to widen the road at Thorpe Audlin in 1814, the directions state that:
“One public carriage road of the width of thirty feet beginning at the town street at the West end of Thorpe near a cottage and Blacksmiths shop in the occupation of Joseph Huntington belonging to James Dixon and extending Eastwards in the line of the present road, over Thorpe Common to the end of an ancient Lane called Mab Lane and to a Cottage occupied by John Turpin belonging to William Smithson”.

Joseph Huntington, junior, married Mary Conway at St Giles Parish Church, Pontefract on the 26th July 1813. Their ages are not recorded but calculating from their ages at death, they must have been about 23 years of age for Joseph and Mary 20 years old. They had two sons, George baptised the 10th of October 1816 and Edward baptised on the 5th October 1819. On the 3rd of April 1822 Mary gave birth to a girl, Sarah. Unfortunately both mother and child died and were buried in Badsworth Church cemetery on the 5th of April. Mary was 33 years old and the baby 2 days.
After his wife’s death it would be a difficult time for Joseph with the forge to attend to and two young boys to care for. He decided to marry again. Her name was Elizabeth Pearson. She came from the village of Wales between Rotherham and Sheffield. Their marriage was solomnised in the Parish Church (now the Cathedral) of All Saints, Wakefield on the 1st of August 1825. This union produced eight more children making eleven in all.
My Great Great Grandfather William Huntington was the seventh of Elizabeth’s eight children. He was christened on the 26th of June 1840.
Their eldest daughter Mary bore an illegitimate child, a girl whom she named Ann, on the 23rd of March 1843. This was seven months before her mother bore her eighth and last child.
Joseph, William’s father, eventually went blind. On the 1871 census he is recorded as Joseph Huntington (blind) retired Blacksmith. His wife Elizabeth (Betty) was still alive. He died about the 10th March 1872 and was buried at Badsworth on the 12 March aged 84. The charge by the church for his burial is recorded in the Sacramentals of the church it reads;
‘1872, April 3 to Joseph Huntington Burial 2-Od (10p 1996)
Great Great Grandfather Joseph was not the first generation of the Huntingtons to be Blacksmiths at Thorpe Audlin. The parish register for 1790 at Badsworth has a very interesting document of his christening, it records;
Joseph, son of Joseph Huntington, of Thorpe Audlin, Blacksmith, son of Thomas Huntington of Thorpe Audlin, Blacksmith, by Ann Daughter of John Camplin of Ackworth, Gent’s Servant, was Christened on Sunday, January 17th 1790. was born on Saturday, December 19th, 1789. On the same column is recorded Joseph’s wife’s pedigree as, ‘Sarah the Daughter of Edward Lapidge of Thorpe Audlin, Labourer, by Ann Daughter of’,
The remainder of the information has worn from the sheet. So from this one document, having traced Joseph’s father and grandfather, I know that the Huntingtons had been Blacksmiths at Thorpe Audlin certainly since 1744.
The marriage banns of Joseph Huntington and Sarah Lapidge, were read at Badsworth where they married on Saturday the 23rd July, 1772. They had five children. Two sons Thomas and Joseph and three daughters, Ann, Martha and Sarah.
All the girls died, Anne lived the longest, she was 25 in 1806 when she died of consumption (we know it as tuberculosis) on the 20th of March. Sarah had died much earlier, aged 4 years and 5 months of an ulcerated sore throat she was buried on the 9th of February 1797. Martha lived to the age of sixteen years five months before she died about the 2nd of April 1801. The records simply state that she died of decline, which I think must be the same as her sister Ann’s complaint, consumption.
Their parents died in the eighteen twenties. Sarah was buried on the 17th of January 1821 age 66 and Joseph on the 14th of January 1824 aged 74. In the parish Register of Ackworth is the marriage of Thomas Huntington of Badsworth. (Thorpe Audlin being in the parish) to Ann Camplin, on the 13th of December 1848 by Banns. Thomas’s father, also a Thomas may have been born in July 1711 at Ackworth. His father, Richard possibly Christened at Ackworth on October 18th 1679.
The Huntington name is first recorded at Ackworth in 1522. I have possible connections to this family through Richard Huntington.



THE BREWSTER FAMILY 1755 - 1938

The Brewster family lived for many years at Thorpe Audlin. My paternal Great Great Grandfather, Thomas Brewster, was the son of Richard and Hannah. Richard came from the village of Darrington. Although he was born in the village of Fishlake near Doncaster. His christening was on the 18th of July 1785. He married Hannah Baram when he was 26. The marriage was on the 16th of April 1809 at Badsworth. There were seven sons, William, Richard, Thomas, Joseph, George, Benjamin and David, and three daughters, Betty, Emma, and Hannah.

It was their third son Thomas who married Fanny Moor at Badsworth. The marriage was solemnised on the 9th of December 1838. They had four children. Three girls and a boy. Their first child, a girl, they christened Mary on the 20th of August 1839. Mary gave birth to an illegitimate daughter whom she named Fanny, after her own mother.

Fanny Brewster, junior never married. Thomas Brewster, her Grandfather, was the landlord of the Fox and Hounds public house at Thorpe Audlin from about 1871 until his death in 1895 when it was taken over by his Granddaughter Fanny who kept it until 2nd March 1920, a period of 25 years, ( see Licensing Authority document) a total between them of fifty years as landlords of the Fox and Hounds.

What is most strange is that her mother Mary did not take Fanny with her when she married my Great Grandfather William Huntington.

Before Thomas became landlord of the Fox and Hounds he had worked at the kennels. This would most likely be the kennels of the Badsworth Hunt which until recent times was still hunting. He is recorded on the 1871 Census as landlord of the pub and again on the Census of 1881 when my future grandmother Mary Huntington is living with them. She was then 17 years old.
Fanny (junior) is described as “daughter” aged 13 on the 1871 Census. This gives us a clue as to how the relationship was thought to be. But this could again simply be a “mis-recorded” item by the person who wrote the census.
The last records of Thomas as Landlord is on the 1889 Kelly’s Directory and the 1891 Census. On both he is at the Fox and Hounds pub in Thorpe Audlin. By the time of Kelly’s Directory his wife Fanny had died on the 1st of October 1889 aged 79. She was buried in the Badsworth church cemetery.

On the 1891 Census Fanny ( junior) was still living at the pub, she was now in 1891 aged 33. Thomas died on the 8th of January 1895 aged 80. He was buried with his wife. There is a headstone on the grave which is on the North side of the church. The inscription reads:

FANNY
wife of THOMAS BREWSTER
of Thorpe Audlin
Born June 2nd 1810
Died October 9th 1889
also the above
THOMAS BREWSTER
born July 29th 1814
Died January 4th 1895“
For so he Giveth His Beloved Sleep”

Alongside their grave is that of their daughter Elizabeth and son-in-law Frederick Taylor.
After the death of Thomas the licensing authority changed the license to Fanny Brewster. The LICENSING ACT 1902 ‘records the change of the License to her thus’:
REGISTER OF LICENSES Granted in petty Sessional Division of Upper Osgoldcross.
Fanny Brewster, Fox and Hounds, Thorpe Audlin, Carters, Knottingley Brewery Co Ltd, 2nd March 1895. Innkeepers 7 days.
This was four months after her Grandfather’s death. She stayed at the pub until she retired in 1920. The change of License from Fanny to the next landlord reads “Bertie Booth, 3rd January 1920”.
After her retirement she went to live at Thurnscoe, near Rotherham. Fanny’s address at the time of her death on the 26th of February 1938, was 8 The Shopping Centre, Thurnscoe, she was aged 80. She was buried in the cemetery at Badsworth possibly in the same grave as her Grandparents but her name is not on the headstone.
Before Brewsters became the landlords John Bell was the landlord in 1857 and before this in 1838 it was known as a beer house and was kept by John Sharpley. (see White’s Directory for these dates).


THE TAYLOR FAMILY OF BADSWORTH

Another family which came within my ancestry is the Taylor family of Badsworth.
Elizabeth Taylor was the sister of my Great Grandmother Mary Huntington, both formally Brewster.
Elizabeth married Frederick Taylor at St Mary’s parish church on Christmas Day 1877. She bore him four children. Frederick John and Louisa both christened on the 13th of April 1879, Frances, on the 11th of April 1880 and Richard, on the 15th of October 1882.
Elizabeth died in 1886 and was buried on the 7th March 1886 aged 35. After her death Frederick had to bring up the young children on his own, which he did with the help of his in-laws, because there is no record of him re-marrying. He died on the 6th of September 1911 aged 61, and was buried with his wife in the grave next to her grandparents. He was a widower for twenty five years.
I have some knowledge of the children from the school Log Books which are extant and are kept in the Archives at Wakefield. From these records there are two specific references to the Taylor children 1887
Thursday June 18th 1877.
I find that Alfred Chopping and Lily Taylor will be unable owing to weak intellect and previous neglect, to do standard I work, I have therefore, with the consent of the Manager, put them both into the Infants Class
(signed) Catherine Jones. F E Hopwood
There is no further individual reference to Lily in the Log Books except as being absent with her brother and sisters:
Monday December 2nd“
The four Taylor’s from the Fox and Hounds away from school on account of Low Fever.”
There is one further mention of the family this time the son:
1891 page 83 Thursday December 17th“
Hit Fed J Taylor on side of head with open hand because he had scribbled on the Composition paper and then torn it. I’m going to speak his father about his behavior”
No further details of this incident is recorded so the result of the talk with his father, if it took place, cannot be known, I wonder if it was anything like the following from the Log Book.

Wednesday , page 50 November 21st“
This afternoon I have sent William Taylor home for violence. I have also sent a note home to his mother detailing circumstances - The boy was cause so did not thrash him”
Friday, November 23rd “The boy has been brought back by his mother and severely reprimanded.”
I’m not certain that William Taylor is of the same family as my ancestors relations. Perhaps they were cousins. Any way he seems to have got it from both quarters, school and home!
There was something strange went on with the names of Lily and Frederick John. Also with the recording of their mother’s name In the Parish records the mothers name of two of the children, Frances Eleanor and Richard is written as Sarah, not Elizabeth, it is certainly the same family because the fathers name is Frederick. Also there is no Lily but a Louisa who was baptised on the same date as Frederick John. The Census returns for 1891 give the correct names for the parents but added the initials of both his Grandfathers for Frederick.


SACREMENTALS BADSWORTH PARISH CHURCH from 1838

These records include members of my Huntington and Brewster ancestors.

Date Amount
1839 December 1St by fee from Elizabeth Brewster for Child Christening 6d
[This is for Henry, Elizabeth’s illigitimate son, see family tree]

1840 July 26 by fee from Joseph Huntington at William’s Christening 6d
[Joseph was my Great Great Grandfather and William my Great Grandfather]

1841 October 3 by fee from Thomas Brewster at Child’s Christening 6d
[ After John Simpson Brewster’s Christening]

1842 June 26 by fee from Mary Huntington at Child Christening 6d

1843 April 23 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d
[After their daughter, Sarah’s birth]

1845 May 10 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d

1852 May 4 by fee from Fanny Brewster at her Churching 6d
[After their daughter, Elizabeth’s birth]

1856 May 7 by fee from Elizabeth Huntington for Funeral 4s-0d
[This was for the funeral of Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth [Betty] Huntington,
my Great Great Grandparents. Elizabeth was aged 12.]

1857 November 15 by fee from Fanny Brewster at child Christening £1-2-0d
[After Fanny’s (Junior) Christening, Illegitimate daughter of Mary Brewster.]

1858 December 26 by fee from Thomas Brewster at Child Christening 6d

1861 June 25 by fee from William Huntington & Mary Brewster, Marriage fee
given [2s-0d, see below]. [My Great Grandparents.]

1863 March 24 by fee for Benjamin Brewsters Christening 6d

1869 November 11 to Richard Ellis & Sarah Brewster Marriage 2s-0d
[My Great Grandmother Mary Huntington’s (nee Brewster) sister and
brother-in-law. (see 1843& 1861)]

1872 April 3 to Joseph Huntington’s Burial 2s-0d
[My Great Great Grandfather aged 84, formerly Blacksmith at Thorpe Audlin.]

Note:

There are other Huntingtons recorded eg. George and his wife Alice, formely Skipsey, and their children but I am not certain that they are my relations.


TYTHES AND TAXES for THORPE AUDLIN 1791

page 37

Owner Occupier Close Name Quality Val p/a Annual Amount
Gilbert Smithson John Lapidge £1
John Dixon Joseph Huntington £1
John Dixon Ann Huntington £1


page 39

Gilbert Smithson John Lapidge £1
John Dixon John Huntington £1
John Dixon Ann Huntington £1
------------------------------------ “ -------------------------------

Note; Joseph Huntington was my 3 X great grandfather, Ann Huntington was his mother, and therefore my 4 X Great Grandmother.

COPY of LAST POOR RATE for THORPE AUDLIN
made 10th Day of May 1872

Owned by Occupier Quantity Ground Rental Rateable Value at 9d in £
Col’ Wood Thomas Brewster £6-0-9 £8-2-8 £7-14-11 5s-9d-¾d
There is no equivalent of the old farthing (1/4 of a old penny) in present day money


VALUATION LIST for the Parish of Badsworth in the
COUNTY of YORK

Summary of Owners names & Quantities also Qualities that each Occupier holds under each respective Owner.


VALUATION LIST for the Parish of BADSWORTH in the
COUNTY of YORK

Owner Occupant Quantity G’d Rent Rateable Value
William Whitehead Thomas Brewster £2-3-18 £8-7-5 £7-2-3

1878
Owner Occupant Quantity G’d Rent Rateable Value
Charles Wood Col’ Thomas Brewster £6-0-9 £8-2-8 £7-14-11


INCOME TAX RATE for APRIL 1885

Owned by Occupier Description Situation a.r.p Gross Est R/V Rent
G. Carter Esq Thomas Brewster Fox and Hounds Thorpe A 3s-Od £8-0-0 £6-8-0
Surveyor’s Duty Payable 1885/6£
19-0-0 12s-8d


ACKWORTH POLLING DISTRICT A
Thorpe Audlin

No 549 Brewster Thomas, Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling house, Fox & Hounds Pub.

No 583 Taylor Frederick, Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling House Cottage.
[Frederick Taylor was Mr Brewster’s son-in-law]


VOTING LIST 1891

Thomas Brewster Thorpe Audlin, Pontefract, Dwelling House, Fox & Hounds


HUNTINGTON FAMILY on the CENSUS RETURNS 1841 - 1871

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1841





NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 50 Blacksmith not given

Elizabeth (hw) (m) 39 “ “

George (s) 24 “ “

Joseph (s) 13 “ “

Sarah (d) 11 “ “

Ann (d) 8 “ “

William (s) 11 months “ “


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth
HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 59 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Betty (wf) (m) 48 Wales
(near Sheffield)
William (s) 10 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) 9 Thorpe Audlin

HUNTINGTON
Joseph (hd) (m) 22 Blacksmith /Journeyman Thorpe Audlin

Hannah (wf) (m) 23 Altofts


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1861

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 70 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Betty (wf) (m) 59 Wales (near Sheffield)
William (s) (um) 20 Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1871

HUNTINGTON

Joseph (hd) (m) 83 Retired Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin
[Blind]
Betty (hw) (m) 68 Wales [Between Rotherham and Sheffield]
______________________”___________________


The BREWSTER FAMILY on the CENSUS RETURNS 1841-1891


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1841

NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

BREWSTER

Richard (hd) (m) 55 not given

Hannah (hw) (m) 50 “ “

Hannah (d) 11 “ “

Benjamin (s) 7 “ “

David (s) 4 “ “

Henry (s) 1 [Elizabeth’s illegitimate son] “ “

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 27 “ “

Fanny (hw) (m) 27 “ “

Mary (d) 2 “ “


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851
NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 36 Boiler maker Walton Wood

Fanny (wf) (m) 40 Thorpe Audlin

Mary (d) 11 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

John (s) 9 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Sarah (d) 8 Scholar Thorpe Audlin



CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1861
BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 46 Labourer Walton Wood

Fanny (wf) (m) 50 Thorpe Audlin

Mary (d) (um) 21 Dressmaker Thorpe Audlin

Sarah (d) (um) 18 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) 10 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (G’d) 3 Thorpe Audlin
[Mary’s illegitimate daughter]


FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE 1871
BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 56 Landlord ( Fox & Hounds) Upton

Fanny (wf) (m) 60 Thorpe Audlin

Elizabeth (d) (um) 19 Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (d) 13 Thorpe Audlin


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1881
FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (m) 66 Publican Badsworth

Fanny (wf) (m) 70 Badsworth

Fanny (g/d) (um) 23 Bar Maid Badsworth
NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth
HUNTINGTON

Mary 16 Servant Thorpe Audlin

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1891
FOX & HOUNDS PUBLIC HOUSE

BREWSTER

Thomas (hd) (wd) 77 Publican Thorpe Audlin

Fanny (G’d) (um) 33 Housekeeper Thorpe Audlin

HEPWORTH

Mary (vst) (m) 26 [my Grandmother] Thorpe Audlin

Wilfred Charles (vst) 7 months [this should be 7 years] Darrington


CENSUS RETURNS THORPE AUDLIN 1881-1891

TAYLOR FAMILY

CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1881

TAYLOR

Frederick (hd) (m) 31 General labourer Saltwood Green
Kent
Elizabeth (wf) (m) 29 [nee Brewster] Badsworth

Frederick I T B (s) 3 Badsworth

Louisa Taylor (d) 2 Badsworth

Frances Eleoner (d) 1 Badsworth

[Their son’s names were Ingram Taylor Brewster Taylor]
[Ingram and Brewster were the surnames of his Grandparents]


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1891

Cottage

TAYLOR

Frederick (hd) (wd) 41 Groom/domestic servant. Saltwood Green

Frederick I T (s) 13 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Lily (d) 12 Scholar Thorpe Audlin
NAME TITLE AGE EMPLOYMENT Place of Birth

Frances E (d) 11 Scholar Thorpe Audlin

Richard (s) 9 Scholar Thorpe Audlin



CENSUS RETURNS 1851-1891
WESTERMAN FAMILY


CENSUS THORPE AUDLIN 1851

WESTERMAN

Thomas (hd) (m) 23 master Blacksmith Thorpe Audlin

Mary Ann (wf) (m) 30 Middlesborough

Susarnah (d) 2 ( name as spelt on return) Ackworth

Arthur (s) 5 months Thorpe Audlin

Charles (Neph) (u) 21 Blacksmith’s Apprentice Ackworth


BREWSTER FAMILY TREE 1779 - 1861

Katherine Brewster


John
b1-7-1755
at Bubwith Pc

Married 30 March 1779 at Fishlake parish Church
JOHN BRUISTER = ELIZABETH SCALES

Richard
c18-7-1785 at Fishlake

Married 7-5-1809 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
RICHARD BREWSTER = HANNAH BARAM
b4-4-1790
of Darrington Parents Thomas & Elizabeth Baram.
Neither signed of Badsworth ( nee Holt, Father,
Witnesses Fanny Gardiner Roger Holt of North Elmsall)
& James Gardiner

William Richard Thomas Joseph Betty
bn1-8-1809 c4-10-1812 c28-8-1814 c12-5-1816 c5-5-1819
c10-9-1809 m31-5-1836 m9-12-1838 d20-8-1817 Henry
Rebecca Hill c1-12-1839
Ackworth Pc (s/o Betty, single women )


George Emma Hannah Benjamin David
c24-2-1827 c20-10-1829 c18-12-1831 c20-4-1834 c23-4-1837

Married 9-12-1838 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
THOMAS BREWSTER = FANNY MOOR
d8-1-1895 age 80 d11-10-1889 age 79
Buried in Badsworth Parish Church Cemetry


Mary John Simpson Sarah Elizabeth
c30-8-1839 c 15-9-1841 c2-4-1843 c4-8-1851
m11-11-1869 m25-12-1877
Richard Ellis Frederick Taylor
Fanny (d/oMary, single women) Father, Henry, Father, Ingram Taylor
c13-11-1857 Witnesses Witnesses
d26-2-1938 age 80 Jane Taylor & Charles Crossley &
at No8 Shopping Centre, Thurnsco. Mary Huntington Fanny Brewster,
buried in Badsworth Church Cemetry [nee Brewster] [Elizabeth’s, neice.] [Sarah’s sister].


Married 25-6-1861 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
MARY BREWSTER = WILLIAM HUNTINGTON


TAYLOR FAMILY 1838-1911

Married 9-12-1838 at St Mary’s parish Church, Badsworth
THOMAS BREWSTER = FANNY MOOR

Elizabeth
c4-8-1851
Married 25-12-1877 at St Mary’s Parish Chuch Badsworth
ELIZABETH BREWSTER = FREDERICK TAYLOR
age 26 age 27 Labourer brd 7-3-1886 age 35 d5-9-1911 age 61 buried in Badsworth Church Cemetry
Father, Thomas Brewster Father, Ingram Taylor Witnesses, Charles Crossley & Fanny Brewster [Elizabeth’s, neice.]

Frederick John (Lily) Louisa Frances Eleoner Richard
b1878 c13-4-1879 c11-4-1880 c15-10-1882
c 13-4-1879

In the parish records the mother’s name of Frances Eleoner and Richard is recorded as Sarah, also there is no Lily but a Louisa who was baptised on the same date as Frederick John. He did not have the initials ‘I’ (could it be Ingram) nor the ‘B’ (could it be Brewster) on the Baptismal Register. Did he adopt these names after the death of his mother (formerly Brewster) and his Grandfather Ingram Taylor?


HUNTINGTON FAMILY 1522 - 1884

Henry Huntington =
of Ackworth 1522

Henry Huntington, Junior = Elizabeth
of Ackworth in 1522-24, will proved in 1557
? same as Henry Huntington
of Hesill, who died in 1556

Thomas John = Margaret Robert
curate, then rector died 1571
of Ackworth died 1578
John Huntington John “my bastered son”

Roger Smithson of Ackworth = ... Huntington
gent. Will (P C York.) 1604;
proved 1605; “ to be buried at
Normanton”; Robt.Cawood a
Witness.

Ann Smithson = Henry Hunt - Thomas Hunt John = Elizabeth ... ?
(and others), ington ington proves of Ackworth, gent. his brother will dated and John’s will in proved 1648 1648

? a daughter married Hy Ash “brother” of J.H. in 1648
Thomas Huntington eldest son.


Henry Huntington
c28-9-1628
at Ackworth
Married 17-4-1654 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
HENRY HUNTINGTON = ELIZABETH DIXON

Henry
date illegible, C1657

Married 28-8-1677 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church , Ackworth
HENRY HUNTINGTON = MARY WATSON

Richard
c18-10-1679

Married c1700 (possibly Ackworth)
RICHARD HUNTINGTON = (wife’ name not found)

Thomas
c8-7-1712

Married 13-12-1748 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
THOMAS HUNTINGTON = ANN CAMPLIN of Badsworth of Ackworth
d August 1767


Joseph Elizabeth Mary Ann Sarah
c12-11-1749 c22-2-1751 c29-11-1756 c4-3-1759 c?-?1765
m25-6-1785 m13-5-1788 age 24
John Parker Robert Briggs age 28
Witnesses Neither signed register
Joseph Huntington & Witnesses Joseph Haigh James Gardener &
Wm Briggs & James Firth

Marriage Banns read 23-7-1772 at St Mary’s parish Church, Badsworth
JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = SARAH LAPEIDGE c11-6-1755 at Badsworth
[Joseph signed register Sarah didn’t]
Witnesses, Wm Wigglesworth & Thos’ Peat
d14-1-1824 age 74 d17-1-1821 age 66




Thomas Ann Martha Joseph Sarah
bn11-9-1774 bn12-3-1781 bn22-11-1784 bn19-12-1789 bn7-9-1792
c3-10-1774 c17-4-1781 c16-1-1785 c17-1-1790 c18-10-1792
m28-2-1797 d20-3-1806 d02-4-1801 d09-02-1797
Elizabeth age 25 age 16y 5m age 4y 5 months Boothroyd, consumption decline Ulcerated sore
Kirksmeaton Pc throat

Married 26-7-1813 at St Gile’s Parish Church, Pontefract
JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = MARY CONWAY of Badsworth of Pontefract d5-4-1822

George Edward Sarah
c10-10-1816 c5-10-1819 c3-4-1822 d5-4-1822
Married 1-8-1825 at All St’s Parish Church, Wakefield JOSEPH HUNTINGTON = ELIZABETH PEARSON (second marriage) b7-3-1803 [village of Wales] d12-3-1872 age 84 burial 30-03-1880 [at Badsworth Parish Church] aged 73

Mary Joseph Sarah Elizabeth
c21-9-1826 c2-6-1829 c4-7-1830 c20-7-1832
m14-4-1856 m4-6-1848 d12-3-1834 William Donbavand Hannah Addy aged 1yr 8mths (widower) Normanton P.C.

Ann
c23-3-1843
illigitimate
daughter of Mary

Ann Betsy William Elizabeth
c25-12-1833 b4-12-1836 b26-6-1840 c1-10-1843 d7-8-1837 d7-5-1856 age 9 months aged 12 yrs

Married 25-6-1861 at St Mary’s Parish Church, Badsworth
WILLIAM HUNTINGTON = MARY BREWSTER
d31-8-1866 aged 25
[killed in the quarry when a large stone fell on him]
[Mary Huntington remarried, see Westerman family]

William Mary Elizabeth bn?-?-1863 bn17-4-1864 c4-11-1866 m9-2-1883 age 17 spinster Thomas Hickling, age 23 Batch, Engine Driver. John Hickling, Labourer

re-married April/May/June quarter 1870 at ? Church
MARY HUNTINGTON = CHARLES WESTERMAN
AGE 30 [widow] age 20 Batchelor

Married 26-2-1884 at St Cuthbert’s Parish Church, Ackworth
MARY HUNTINGTON = JAMES HENRY HEPWORTH

The early records of the Huntington family (1522 - 1657) are taken from the book ‘Historical Antiquities of ACKWORTH’ compiled by W.A.GREEN, which was re-issued by Christine Williams - Brown and Ada Pritchard in limited edition of 1989. I have a copy of this publication.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

During my research of the many families connected with the Hepworth family I have received advice, assistance, and guidance from many sources. I wish to place on record my gratitude to the following without whom none of this geneology or history could have been researched and written. Any discrepancy in the text, false dates, names or information are my responsibility.

I have a special thank you to express to my late wife Syvia who began it all, and to my children and other members of my family who have shown their interest in my efforts and so encouraged me. If there are others who have helped me but whom I have failed to acknowledge I would ask for their understanding.

The staff of all the following places have been courteous, understanding and patient with my many enquiries and problems.

Local History Department; Reference Department, both of
Huddersfield, Kirklees Library Services.
Local History Department, Wakefield Central Library, Baln Lane, Wakefield.
Leeds City Library, Leeds
West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield
West Yorkshire Archive Service, Leeds
Yorkshire Archeological Society, Leeds
Registrar’s Offices; Huddersfield, Wakefield, Pontefract, Doncaster
Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, York.
Huddersfield Family History Society
Doncaster Family History Society
Wakefield Family History Society
The incumbants of the Anglican Churches whom I have contacted.
The many Family Historians whom I have contacted during my research, who are too numerous to mention individually.
Quotations are taken from the following authors book’s;“
The Historical Antiquities of Ackworth”, compiled by W.A.Green, re-issued
1989 by Christine Williams-Brown B.A., A.L.A and Ada Pritchard
For Information on Joseph Huntington; The John Goodchild Collection. Local History Study Centre, below Central Library, Wakefield.
And to Charles L. Birdsall and the Staff of Rogerthorpe Manor for their assistance.

Gordon Hepworth
Family Historian